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In JUnit 3, I could get the name of the currently running test like this:

public class MyTest extends TestCase
{
    public void testSomething()
    {
        System.out.println("Current test is " + getName());
        ...
    }
}

which would print "Current test is testSomething".

Is there any out-of-the-box or simple way to do this in JUnit 4?

Background: Obviously, I don't want to just print the name of the test. I want to load test-specific data that is stored in a resource with the same name as the test. You know, convention over configuration and all that.

Thanks!

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What does the above code give you in JUnit 4? –  Bill the Lizard Jan 23 '09 at 15:56
5  
JUnit 3 tests extend TestCase where getName() is defined. JUnit 4 tests do not extend a base class, so there is no getName() method at all. –  Dave Ray Jan 23 '09 at 16:01
    
I have a similar problem where I want to <b>set</b> the test name since I'm using the Parametrized runner that only gives me numbered test cases. –  ShiDoiSi Feb 16 '09 at 1:21

10 Answers 10

up vote 153 down vote accepted

JUnit 4.7 added this feature it seems. Looks like this will get you the method name:

import org.junit.Rule;

public class NameRuleTest {
    @Rule public TestName name = new TestName();

    @Test public void testA() {
        assertEquals("testA", name.getMethodName());
    }

    @Test public void testB() {
        assertEquals("testB", name.getMethodName());
    }
}
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1  
import org.junit.Rule; –  jm. Nov 5 '09 at 16:27
1  
Also note that TestName is not available in @before :( See: old.nabble.com/… –  jm. Nov 5 '09 at 16:34
16  
Apparently newer versions of JUnit execute @Rule before @Before - I'm new to JUnit and was depending on TestName in my @Before without any difficulties. –  MightyE Apr 16 '10 at 11:36
3  
There are more efficient ways of doing this available. –  Duncan Dec 21 '12 at 9:57
    
Github links no longer work :( –  Toby Apr 4 '13 at 7:31

JUnit 4.7.x - 4.8.x

The following approach will print method names for all tests in a class:

@Rule
public MethodRule watchman = new TestWatchman() {
   public void starting(FrameworkMethod method) {
      System.out.println("Starting test: " + method.getName());
   }
};


JUnit 4.9.x onwards

Since JUnit 4.9, the TestWatchman class has been deprecated in favour of the TestWatcher class, which has a similar invocation:

@Rule
public TestRule watcher = new TestWatcher() {
   protected void starting(Description description) {
      System.out.println("Starting test: " + description.getMethodName());
   }
};
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Not working in Eclips 4 –  takacsot Jan 21 at 7:17
    
@takacsot That's surprising. Can you please post a fresh question about this and ping me the link here? –  Duncan Jan 21 at 8:12

JUnit 4 does not have any out-of-the-box mechanism for a test case to get it’s own name (including during setup and teardown).

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1  
Is there an not-out-of-the-box mechanism out there other than inspecting the stack? –  Dave Ray Jan 23 '09 at 17:12
2  
Not the case given the answers below! maybe assign the correct answer to someone else? –  Toby Apr 4 '13 at 7:30

A convoluted way is to create your own Runner by subclassing org.junit.runners.BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.

You can then do something like this:

public class NameAwareRunner extends BlockJUnit4ClassRunner {

    public NameAwareRunner(Class<?> aClass) throws InitializationError {
        super(aClass);
    }

    @Override
    protected Statement methodBlock(FrameworkMethod frameworkMethod) {
        System.err.println(frameworkMethod.getName());
        return super.methodBlock(frameworkMethod);
    }
}

Then for each test class, you'll need to add a @RunWith(NameAwareRunner.class) annotation. Alternatively, you could put that annotation on a Test superclass if you don't want to remember it every time. This, of course, limits your selection of runners but that may be acceptable.

Also, it may take a little bit of kung fu to get the current test name out of the Runner and into your framework, but this at least gets you the name.

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Conceptually at least, this idea seems rather straightforward to me. My point being: I wouldn't call it convoluted. –  user98761 Dec 13 '12 at 0:08
    
"on a Test superclass ..." - Please, no more of the horrible inheritance based design patterns. This is so JUnit3! –  oberlies Aug 6 '13 at 11:00

Consider using SLF4J (Simple Logging Facade for Java) provides some neat improvements using parameterized messages. Combining SLF4J with JUnit 4 rule implementations can provide more efficient test class logging techniques.

import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.rules.MethodRule;
import org.junit.rules.TestWatchman;
import org.junit.runners.model.FrameworkMethod;
import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;

public class LoggingTest {

  @Rule public MethodRule watchman = new TestWatchman() {
    public void starting(FrameworkMethod method) {
      logger.info("{} being run...", method.getName());
    }
  };

  final Logger logger =
    LoggerFactory.getLogger(LoggingTest.class);

  @Test
  public void testA() {

  }

  @Test
  public void testB() {

  }
}
share|improve this answer

Try this instead:

public class MyTest {
        @Rule
        public TestName testName = new TestName();

        @Rule
        public TestWatcher testWatcher = new TestWatcher() {
            @Override
            protected void starting(final Description description) {
                String methodName = description.getMethodName();
                String className = description.getClassName();
                className = className.substring(className.lastIndexOf('.') + 1);
                System.err.println("Starting JUnit-test: " + className + " " + methodName);
            }
        };

        @Test
        public void testA() {
                assertEquals("testA", testName.getMethodName());
        }

        @Test
        public void testB() {
                assertEquals("testB", testName.getMethodName());
        }
}

The output looks like this:

Starting JUnit-test: MyTest testA
Starting JUnit-test: MyTest testB

NOTE: This DOES NOT work if your test is a subclass of TestCase! The test runs but the @Rule code just never runs.

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1  
God bless you for your NOTE at the very of the example. –  user655419 Sep 29 '13 at 15:09

I'd suggest you decouple the test method name from your test data set. I would model a DataLoaderFactory class which loads/caches the sets of test data from your resources, and then in your test case cam call some interface method which returns a set of test data for the test case. Having the test data tied to the test method name assumes the test data can only be used once, where in most case i'd suggest that the same test data in uses in multiple tests to verify various aspects of your business logic.

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@ClassRule
public static TestRule watchman = new TestWatcher() {
    @Override
    protected void starting( final Description description ) {
        String mN = description.getMethodName();
        if ( mN == null ) {
            mN = "setUpBeforeClass..";
        }

        final String s = StringTools.toString( "starting..JUnit-Test: %s.%s", description.getClassName(), mN );
        System.err.println( s );
    }
};
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Most likely, Bill the Lizard is right. In case it still doesn't work out, you could extract the test name from the stack dump of the current thread (Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()) -- rather hacky, but maybe the end justifies the means :)

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String testName = null;
StackTraceElement[] trace = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace();
for (int i = trace.length - 1; i > 0; --i) {
    StackTraceElement ste = trace[i];
    try {
        Class<?> cls = Class.forName(ste.getClassName());
        Method method = cls.getDeclaredMethod(ste.getMethodName());
        Test annotation = method.getAnnotation(Test.class);
        if (annotation != null) {
            testName = ste.getClassName() + "." + ste.getMethodName();
            break;
        }
    } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
    } catch (SecurityException e) {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
All of which is pointless given @FroMage's answer, though. –  skaffman Dec 30 '10 at 23:11

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