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I have a list with several urls like

google.com
google.com/1
google.com/2
google.com/3
google.com/4
google.com/5
google.com/6
yahoo.com
yahoo.com/1
yahoo.com/2
yahoo.com/3
yahoo.com/4
yahoo.com/5
yahoo.com/6

How can I remove the first the 3 entries keeping google.com/3 to 6 and same goes for yahoo?

share|improve this question
1  
Under what form do you have those entries? A collection, a string, something else? Also why is your question titled with duplicate urls where I cannot see any duplicate urls in your list. – Darin Dimitrov Jan 19 '11 at 10:30
    
@Tim your edit implies in a different a different answer – Jader Dias Jan 19 '11 at 10:39
1  
@Jader Dias: I have just reformatted it as the linebreaks in the original post were not visible because james hadn't used the {} button for the sample. – Tim Pietzcker Jan 19 '11 at 10:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In C#:

resultString = Regex.Replace(subjectString, 
    @"^        # Start at the start of a line
    [^/\r\n]+  # Match one or more characters except /
    $          # Match the end of the line, thereby ensuring that
               # the entire line does not contain a /
    (?:        # Match the following group:
     \r\n      # - a linebreak
     .*        # - an entire line
    ){2}       # exactly twice
    \r\n       # Match the final line break", 
    "", RegexOptions.Multiline | RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace);

Resulting string:

google.com/3
google.com/4
google.com/5
google.com/6
yahoo.com/3
yahoo.com/4
yahoo.com/5
yahoo.com/6
share|improve this answer
    
you answered the the question title and I answered the last question in the question body – Jader Dias Jan 19 '11 at 10:37

I'm not sure Regex are the best approach to this. But here's it anyway:

s/(google.com[\s/\d]*){3}//
s/(yahoo.com[\s/\d]*){3}//

Regexes are enclosed in slashes and the preceeding s is substitution in vi notation

share|improve this answer
    
since I answered this the OP edited the question. please check the original version before you criticize this answer – Jader Dias Jan 19 '11 at 10:38

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