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I am working on a Portal and want to detect whether the users in on our domain. I have been told that the best way to do this is to do a reverse DNS lookup to check the remote host and whether the user is on our domain and then log them in using their AD credentials.

We want the user to be logged in if they are on our domain:

First we'll do an IP Range check then a reverse DNS lookup...

On another system we use this code in an ASP page

Dim oIIS
Dim vEnableRevDNS
Dim vDisableRevDNS

vEnableRevDNS = 1
vDisableRevDNS = 0

Set oIIS = GetObject("IIS://localhost/w3svc/1/ROOT")
oIIS.Put "EnableReverseDNS", vEnableRevDNS
oIIS.SetInfo
Set oIIS = Nothing

Is there a way to do this in MVC 2:C#?

To clarify: I will still be using Windows Integrated Authentication - however I want the process to be seamless... if you are our network you get automatically logged in... if you are not you get forwarded to a login page

There will be intranet/ extranet and public user access - each will have a different login process - I want to use reverse DNS purely as a mechanism to direct to an entry point.

Thanks for any pointers.

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Reverse DNS and ActiveDirectory user lookup have nothing in common. What do you want to do? What is your input and what is the expected output? Describe your scenario in more details. How are you authenticating your users on the ASP.NET site? –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 19 '11 at 10:37
    
Yes, wouldn't the best means of ensuring that users are from your domain be by having them log in/authenticate? –  spender Jan 19 '11 at 10:45
    
Sorry guys in my spec I have this note: Single sign-on via Integrated Windows Authentication will be used to authenticate the user. This will be fully automated, using network detection such as reverse DNS to identify the user type. –  beebul Jan 19 '11 at 10:59
    
Darin Dimitrov there will be intranet/extranet and public users - each will have a different login process - I want to use reverse DNS purely as a mechanism to direct to an entry point. –  beebul Jan 19 '11 at 13:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Reverse DNS is not a strong authentication mechanism.

Integrated windows authentication is an IIS/ASP.NET option. You turn it on, and the browser and IIS handles the rest. Users arrive at your application authenticated. (Make sure you have anonymous access turned off)

Edit: DNS is not an authentication mechanism at all. Whomever wrote your technical spec should go and read up on how Windows Integrated Authentication (NTLM/Kerberos) actually works.

Suffice to say, it doesn't rely on the DNS entry assigned to your machine.

Edit 2:

For Windows Integrated Authentication to be seamless, you need three things on a client machine:

  • Using a browser that supports NTLM/Kerberos-Auth (Internet Explorer, and with the correct settings: Firefox)
  • Using a machine that is a member of that Active Directory domain (This may also work for other trusted AD Domains)
  • Logged into an AD domain account.

With this, then you'll get automatic sign-in. No prompting, you're just there.

If, however you're not meeting those, then in Internet Explorer and Firefox you'll receive a standard password prompt (not in your application, just the standard browser one). You don't get the option of showing a friendly error message, as this is handled outside of your application context.

If the user is using a browser that doesnt' support NTLM/Kerberos, you'll either recieve endless authentication prompts - or the browser will just display the 'access denied' page.

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Thanks for the information - let me please stress that I will still be using Windows Integrated Authentication - however I want the process to be seamless... if you are our network you get automatically logged in... if you are not you get forwarded to a login page. –  beebul Jan 19 '11 at 13:13
    
@beebul - Edited my answer again. You won't get a login page option though. –  Will Hughes Jan 19 '11 at 13:25

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