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Parent class(*ch.qos.logback.core.FileAppender*):

     ...

   protected String fileName = null;

   public FileAppender() {
      }

          public void setFile(String file) {
            if (file == null) {
              fileName = file;
            } else {
              // Trim spaces from both ends. The users probably does not want
              // trailing spaces in file names.
              String val = file.trim();
              fileName = val;
            }
          }
    ...

Child class:

    ...
   public class FileAppender<E> extends ch.qos.logback.core.FileAppender<E> {

     private FileResourceManager frm  = new FileResourceManager(fileName, tempDir, false, loggerFacade);


     public void writeOut(E event) throws IOException {
      Object txId = null;
      try {
       frm.start();
       txId = frm.generatedUniqueTxId();
       frm.startTransaction(txId);
       outputStream = frm.writeResource(txId, fileName, true);
       outputStream.write(event.toString().getBytes());
       frm.commitTransaction(txId);

      }

      catch (Exception e) {
    ...
      }
     }

The problem is that fileName is passed as null to frm in this line:

private FileResourceManager frm  = new FileResourceManager(fileName, tempDir, false, loggerFacade);

How can i create frm instance,with not-null fileName,e.g. already initialized in parent?

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2  
setFile isn't related to the question, it's not called from anywhere. You'd better show constructor taking string instead (the one you invoke in new SomeClass(fileName)). –  Nikita Rybak Jan 19 '11 at 10:46
3  
Please provide a short but complete program demonstrating the problem. It's really not clear what classes you have at the moment. –  Jon Skeet Jan 19 '11 at 10:47
    
@Jon: i've edited post and inserted concrete code,and the idea remained the same –  sergionni Jan 19 '11 at 11:25
    
This is far from a short but complete program. We want to help you - please make it easy for us to do so. Read tinyurl.com/so-hints. –  Jon Skeet Jan 19 '11 at 11:28
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5 Answers 5

If I understand your question correctly, you can do one of the following:

  • call setFile(file) in constructor of child class
  • implement logics placed in setFile() method in child's constructor (BTW, that'll be code duplication)
  • if parent class provides constructor, which accepts file parameter, call parent's constructor with super(file) in constructor of child class

UPDATE

AFAIU, the problem is in fields initialization order. The moving "frm" field initialization into child class constructor should solve the problem:

public FileAppender(String fileName) {
    setFile(fileName);
    frm  = new FileResourceManager(fileName, tempDir, false, loggerFacade);
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
logic of setFile() in child class should be the same - I needn't code duplication, I just need that my child class has already initialized fileName param. See my post edited, i inserted real code snippets. –  sergionni Jan 19 '11 at 11:27
    
parent class has only no-param constructur(ch.qos.logback.core.FileAppender) –  sergionni Jan 19 '11 at 11:28
    
Updated answer in accordance with comments. –  Kel Jan 19 '11 at 11:50
    
Kel, i can't cretae parametrized constructor in child:Failed to instantiate [ch.qos.logback.classic.LoggerContext] ... caused by:java.lang.InstantiationException: xxx.common.logging.FileAppender –  sergionni Jan 19 '11 at 11:53
    
Then how would you like to pass fileName to instance of child class? –  Kel Jan 19 '11 at 12:17
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Is setFile an override that you are calling from the parent class constructor? In that case: The parent class constructor runs before the useful part fo the child constructor. So setFile is called from the parent class constructor, and then control is returned to the child class constructor which you have nulling out that variable.

The instance field initialisers and instance initialisers are actually part of constructors, after the possibly implicit call to super (but not if they call this()). I believe C sharp inserts instance initialisers before the call to super (but they can't reference this).

What to do: Avoiding inheritance is always good. In particular avoid protected variables and calling overridable methods from constructors. Keep constructors simple. And don't add = null to instance fields.

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setFile() is method in parent class,that initialize fileName param. see my post updated.I need to get already setted fileName in child class when do new for child class instance field. –  sergionni Jan 19 '11 at 11:38
    
So where is setFile being called from. In the new code, you are using the field from the derived class constructor (via an instance field initialiser). So unless you are calling it from the base class constructor, it doesn't look like you'll have set the field before use. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 19 '11 at 12:20
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Resolved with following code:

private static FileResourceManager frm;
    public void writeOut(E event) throws IOException {
        ...

        if (frm == null) {
            frm = new FileResourceManager(fileName, tempDir, false, loggerFacade);
        }

        Object txId = null;
        try {
...
        }

        catch (Exception e) {
...
}
    }

fileName is initialized(not null) within writeOut() method. Not very gracefully,but looks like simplest solution in my case.

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You have to call the setFile() method in the parent class.

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Assuming that your "parent class" is the SomeClass class, overwrite the default constructor there:

public Someclass(String fileName) {
   this.fileName = fileName;
}
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