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I wish to stub all dependencies out in my Rhino.Mocks unit tests, but I end up repeating myself. As the number of dependencies keeps increasing, I need to revisit my existing unit tests and need to add the dependencies. It's unsatisfying and also a signal that I should be doing it in another way.

If I just move initialization to a separate method, I pass into it all the mocks and I have achieved nothing.

Is there a way to initialize and then pass the Using(mocks.Record) into a method as a lambda expression? Or how do you do it?!

Thanks in advance for any comments,

Anders, Denmark

    [Test, Category("UnitTest")]
    public void TestThatApplicationCanExitByDefault()
    {
        var mocks = new MockRepository();

        var workspaceViewModelProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IWorkspaceViewModelProvider>();
        var workspaceRepository = mocks.StrictMock<IWorkspaceService>();
        var userResponseProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IUserResponseProvider>();
        var versionProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IVersionProvider>();
        var eventAggregator = mocks.StrictMock<IEventAggregator>();
        var allowedLegacyImportProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IAllowedLegacyImportProvider>();
        var stateManager = mocks.StrictMock<IStateManager>();
        var currentWorkspaceChangedEvent = mocks.StrictMock<CurrentWorkspaceChangedEvent>();

        using (mocks.Record())
        {
            // constructor fires:
            eventAggregator
                .Stub(x => x.GetEvent<CurrentWorkspaceChangedEvent>())
                .Return(currentWorkspaceChangedEvent);

            currentWorkspaceChangedEvent
                .Stub(x => x.Subscribe(null))
                .IgnoreArguments();
        }

        var target = new MainWindowViewModel(
            workspaceViewModelProvider,
            workspaceRepository,
            userResponseProvider,
            versionProvider, eventAggregator, allowedLegacyImportProvider, stateManager);

        var canAppExit = target.CanAppExit();

        Assert.IsTrue(canAppExit);

        mocks.VerifyAll();
    }


    [Test, Category("UnitTest")]
    public void TestThatInsertProjectWorks()
    {
        var mocks = new MockRepository();

        var workspaceViewModelProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IWorkspaceViewModelProvider>();
        var workspaceRepository = mocks.StrictMock<IWorkspaceService>();
        var userResponseProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IUserResponseProvider>();
        var versionProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IVersionProvider>();
        var eventAggregator = mocks.StrictMock<IEventAggregator>();
        var allowedLegacyImportProvider = mocks.StrictMock<IAllowedLegacyImportProvider>();
        var stateManager = mocks.StrictMock<IStateManager>();
        var currentWorkspaceChangedEvent = mocks.StrictMock<CurrentWorkspaceChangedEvent>();
        var workspaceViewModel = mocks.StrictMock<IWorkspaceViewModel>();

        using (mocks.Record())
        {
            // constructor fires:
            eventAggregator
                .Stub(x => x.GetEvent<CurrentWorkspaceChangedEvent>())
                .Return(currentWorkspaceChangedEvent);

            currentWorkspaceChangedEvent
                .Stub(x => x.Subscribe(null))
                .IgnoreArguments();

            workspaceViewModelProvider
                .Stub(x => x.GetViewModel())
                .Return(workspaceViewModel);

            workspaceViewModel
                .Stub(x => x.InsertProject());
        }

        var target = new MainWindowViewModel(
            workspaceViewModelProvider,
            workspaceRepository,
            userResponseProvider,
            versionProvider, eventAggregator, allowedLegacyImportProvider, stateManager);

        target.InsertProject();

        mocks.VerifyAll();
    }
share|improve this question
    
gotta love unit tests that are harder to understand than the code under test (and I'm not just singling out yours, mine too!) –  Mitch Wheat Jan 19 '11 at 12:38
    
yup - it's certainly more elaborate than the code under test ;-) –  Anders Juul Jan 19 '11 at 12:45
    
Maybe the tests are telling you something here. #1) Too many dependencies? Maybe you could aggregate clusters from the dependency list or move some of them down into method parameters if possible. #2) do you need all those mocks to test CanAppExit()? Pass in null if the dependency is irrelevant to the test. –  Gishu Jan 20 '11 at 4:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I tend to have a helper method which is responsible for building my mocks, and this method takes a lambda. The lambda can then communicate the mocks to a test. I have overloads of the test helper method to form an API and thus restrict what mocks are available to the test. In this way mock building can be centralized and so minimize dependency tramping across your tests.

It's more obvious with an example. This uses Moq, but the technique is general.

    private static void RunTest(Action<IThing1> test)
    {
        RunTest(test: (thing1, thing2, thing3) => test(thing1));
    }

    private static void RunTest(Action<IThing1, IThing2> test)
    {
        RunTest(test: (thing1, thing2, thing3) => test(thing1, thing2));
    }

    private static void RunTest(Action<IThing1, IThing2, IThing3> test)
    {
        IThing1 thing1 = new Mock<IThing1>().Object;
        IThing2 thing2 = new Mock<IThing2>().Object;
        IThing3 thing3 = new Mock<IThing3>().Object;

        test(thing1, thing2, thing3);
    }

    [Test]
    public void do_some_stuff_to_a_thing()
    {
        RunTest(test: thing1 => {
            //Do some testing....
        });
    }

    [Test]
    public void do_some_stuff_to_things()
    {
        RunTest(test: (thing1, thing2) => {
            //Do some testing....
        });
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Neat! Just what I was asking for! –  Anders Juul Jan 19 '11 at 13:00
    
@Anders Glad it's helpful. Tip: You can up-vote your accepted answer if you really like it ;) –  Tim Lloyd Jan 19 '11 at 13:03

Try using a base class with protected mocked objects and use [SetUp]/[TestFixtureSetUp] (with NUnit for example).

It is wise to put only common objects with initialization to base class - use [SetUp]/[TestFixtureSetUp] in the same class where there are multiple unit tests and you need to mock/initialize something specific only to this tests. Putting everything in your base bloats your unit tests as well (at least they execute longer).

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I would avoid passing dependencies as parameters. Does this work for you? –  Anders Juul Jan 19 '11 at 12:49
    
I almost always use base class for unit testing. I can't imagine having 1000+ unit tests with lots of duplicated code. –  doblak Jan 19 '11 at 12:54
    
Hi darjan, I actually think you gave a perfectly good answer, but one had to get the Answer Tick... –  Anders Juul Jan 19 '11 at 13:02

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