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is it possible to extends a existing object ?

i have the code

var record = new
{
    id,
    name
};

and have a list of anonymous objects

var list = new List<object>(){ object1, object2 };

Can i add them later to the object ? Like something as

foreach (var o in list)
{
    record.add(o);
}

that i will get this as result

var record = new
{
    id,
    name,
    object1,
    object2
};
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2  
Is record a collection and object1 object2 are items? Or object1 is a property of record? –  Danny Chen Jan 19 '11 at 12:47
    
record is a collection, and object1 is a other object that i will add as a new property to record –  Marco Jan 19 '11 at 12:51
    
@Marco - properties are named; items in a list aren't... –  Marc Gravell Jan 19 '11 at 12:55
    
I'm not trying to be funny here, actually curious as to what circumstances you would want to do this? –  Paddy Jan 19 '11 at 13:04
    
@Paddy - To use as a return value for a ajax call, i would make JSON of this object and then return it as actionresult but maybe there are other ways to do this –  Marco Jan 19 '11 at 13:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In short, no. At least, not with anonymous types. There are two approaches here; dynamic might give you what you want, but is fiddly for combining. Other than that, a basic property bag - even simply Dictionary<string,object> would do. The only difference being that:

obj.id

becomes

obj["id"]

There is a more fundamental problem, though, in trying to combine a list (each of which is largely anonymous) with properties in a single step. You can do this for data-binding purpose via custom property models, but it is... tricky.

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3  
The ViewState and the Session objects in asp.net are classic examples of the property bag approach. Anything can go in, anything can come out, and there's no need for convoluted syntax. –  SWeko Jan 19 '11 at 12:54

Since .net4 you could use ExpandoObject to do stuff like that.

For example:

        var objs = new List<ExpandoObject>();

        for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            dynamic eObj = new ExpandoObject();
            eObj.Property = i;
            objs.Add(eObj);
        }

        foreach (dynamic obj in objs)
        {
            obj.Property2 = "bubuValue" + obj.Property;
            obj.Property3 = "bubuValue" + obj.Property2;
        }

        foreach (dynamic obj in objs)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(obj.Property3);
        }
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note that you only keep the Property2 / Property3 of the last obj i objs... –  Marc Gravell Jan 19 '11 at 12:57

What you can do is create a class Extension. It is not possible to add new methods in the runtime, but you can do something like this:

public class OneClass
{
  private List<object> items;
  public List<object> Items { get { return items; } }
  public void AddOne(object item)
  {
    items.Add(item);
  }
}

if you want to extend this class behavior, you can write an extension class. Like this:

public static class OneClassExtensions
{
  public void AddMany(this OneClass self, params object[] items)
  {
    foreach(object item in items)
    {
      self.Items.Add(item);
    }
  }
}

This way you can call this extension method from your OneClass objects:

OneClass obj = new OneClass();
obj.AddOne("hello");
obj.AddMany("Hello", "world"); // Extension method

There are some rules to follow:

  1. The extension class must have the `static' modifier
  2. you need to put the `this' prefix before the first argument. This argument would be the object itself.
  3. In order to use this extension class in your code, you must use the namespace that contains that extension class, like `using Some.Namespace.That.Has.An.Extension' in every .cs file where you want to use extension methods.
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