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So I've done some work in the repository and when I'm about to commit I realize that I'm not currently on any branch. This happens a lot when working with submodules and I am able to solve it, but the process is tedious and I've been thinking that there must be an easier way to do this.

Is there an easy way to get back on a branch, while keeping the changes?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 107 down vote accepted
git stash
git checkout some-branch
git stash pop

?

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12  
This one doesn't help if you've already committed. No downvote though as that wasn't specified in the question. –  Dean Rather May 18 '12 at 5:14
16  
if you've already committed: note the hash of the commit you made (use git show or git rev-parse HEAD), switch to the branch and then git cherry-pick followed by the commit hash. –  araqnid May 18 '12 at 9:35
6  
If committed, get hash of last commit. Checkout the branch you wish to be at, and git merge _hash_ –  Daniel May 31 '12 at 13:31
3  
It would be great with comments in front of each command –  Pierre de LESPINAY Aug 14 '12 at 15:47
    
BE REALLY CAREFUL. IF YOU HAVE COMMITTED THE CHANGE and you follow these steps...You will see the message..."Your branch and origin/master have diverged". –  thinkanotherone Dec 21 '12 at 18:13

the last helped me, but modified.

git checkout -b newbranch
git checkout master
git merge newbranch
git branch -d newbranch
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17  
If you've already made multiple commits, this is what you need to do. –  Benjamin Oakes Mar 27 '12 at 21:55
    
Haven't tried it, but it looks like it would work. However I think it's an unlikely scenario. I believe most people will realize that they're not on any branch before they commit and use the accepted answer to fix that. –  Erik B Mar 29 '12 at 0:43
28  
You would be surprised. –  Eric Aug 31 '12 at 20:43
1  
This works for me! –  vy32 Jan 28 '13 at 3:20
1  
lovely answer, actually just typed it in and worked, unlike pretty much everything else encountered as a GIT beginner - you might like to point out that newbranch is an arbritrary name and not intended to be replaced with a commit hash –  Toni Leigh Dec 2 '13 at 9:01
git checkout master

That's result something like this:

Warning: you are leaving 2 commits behind, not connected to
any of your branches:

1e7822f readme
0116b5b returned to clean django

If you want to keep them by creating a new branch, this may be a good time to do so with:
git branch new_branch_name 1e7822f25e376d6a1182bb86a0adf3a774920e1e

So, let's do it:

git merge 1e7822f25e376d6a1182bb86a0adf3a774920e1e
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I did not try it, but it seems like it would work just fine. I guess if you would run git gc between running those two commands you would lose those commits, but unless you're running git gc automatically this should be a fairly risk free approach. I would still go with babay's answer, but if you want to save yourself from writing two extra commands I guess this is the way to go. –  Erik B Jul 8 '13 at 13:32
    
I had left the master branch at some point, that i'm not totally sure. I had commited my changes, there were no changes on the master. These instructions brought my changes to the master branch and everythings good. –  Matti Jokipii Dec 2 '13 at 14:49

Leaving another way here

git branch newbranch
git checkout master 
git merge newbranch 
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1  
Why do you think it has 31 upvotes and is the accepted answer if it doesn't work? Of course it works. Did you even try it? –  Erik B Mar 24 '12 at 17:28
3  
@ErikB He may have done multiple commits. In that case, see babay's answer. –  Benjamin Oakes Mar 27 '12 at 22:02
    
@BenjaminOakes That may be so, but these git commands aren't even valid. –  Erik B Mar 29 '12 at 0:40
    
@ErikB Definitely true. :) babay's answer is the valid form of what Alex seems to have been trying to do. –  Benjamin Oakes Mar 29 '12 at 12:35
2  
@Erik B Agree. I wrote the answer being kinda distracted. Ofc I missplaced 'branch' and 'checkout' simply swapping them on lines. Why so much hate anyway? Also, as before I do not believe that cool upvoted answer works. Sorry. –  Alex Observer Mar 29 '12 at 20:29

Alternatively, you could setup your submodules so that rather than being in their default detached head state you check out a branch.

Edited to add:

One way is to checkout a particular branch of the submodule when you add it with the -b flag:

git submodule add -b master <remote-repo> <path-to-add-it-to>

Another way is to just go into the submodule directory and just check it out

git checkout master
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1  
Could you tell me how to do that? –  Erik B Jan 20 '11 at 18:18
    
is there a way to update an existing submodule this default branch mode? update gitmodules perhaps? –  Hertzel Guinness May 21 '12 at 14:44
    
@HertzelGuinness Not really. The submodule is checked out at a particular commit sha. A branch is just a pointer to the sha and the sha that it points to can change. This isn't useful because it doesn't freeze the state of the checked out submodule. Checking out a branch is just a convenience if you are making changes to the submodule. –  Abizern May 21 '12 at 15:01

I recently ran into this problem again. It's been a while since I last worked with submodules and having learned more about git I realized that simply checking out the branch you want to commit on is sufficient. Git will keep the working tree even if you don't stash it.

git checkout existing_branch_name

I guess if you want to work on a new branch this should work for you.

git checkout -b new_branch_name

I guess the merge will fail if you have conflicts in the working tree, but that should be quite unusual and if it happens you can just stash it, pop it and resolve the conflict.

Compared to the accepted answer, this answer will save you the execution of two commands, that doesn't really take that long to execute anyway. Therefore I will not accept this answer, unless it miraculously gets more upvotes (or at least close) than the currently accepted answer.

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