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When selecting from an XmlDocument by e.g. the XPath-method SelectSingleNode we get an XmlNode that consist of the first matching node, lets call it <node1>. If we do further selection on <node1> then one might expect that the XPath-root now is this node, but this is incorrect, the root is still the same as in the original XmlDocument. Here's an example:

XmlDocument xd = new XmlDocument();
xd.LoadXml(@"<root>
                 <subroot>
                     <elm>test1</elm>
                     <elm>test2</elm>
                     <elm>test3</elm>
                 </subroot>
             </root>");
XmlNode xnSubRoot = xd.SelectSingleNode("/root/subroot");

//This is the XPath I want to be able to use, but it returns null.
XmlNode xnElm = xnSubRoot.SelectSingleNode("/subroot/elm");

//This works, but the XPath-root is the same as in the original document.
xnElm = xnSubRoot.SelectSingleNode("/root/subroot/elm");

Is there any way to "fix" the root of xnSubRoot so that I can use the XPath I want? The reason for my question is because I have a case where I'm calling a webservice that returns an XmlNode where the OuterXml-property shows a structure of "/Data/SubElement/..." and so on, but when running XPath "/Data" then null is returned, only "/SubElement" works, i.e. the XPath-root seems to be one level lower than the actual document-root.

I'm sure there is a perfectly reasonable explanation for this, or that I'm missing something vital. However I really can't seem to find anything, even though I've read http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d271ytdx(VS.80).aspx.

N.B. I do realize that it would be possible to use the XPath "//subroot/elm", but then I might also get other elements further down in the XML structure.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since your selecting from the Root/SubElement Try this:

XmlNode xnElm = xnSubRoot.SelectSingleNode("elm"); 

It will return the first child elm node of the current node.

Edit (from additionals informations provided in comments):

In this specific case, you are obtaning a XmlNode (which is your Data node) from a WebService call. All XPath requests on that XmlNode will be relative to it.

I would suggest that you modify all your XPaths to use a selector like webServiceNode.SelectSingleNode("SubElement/SubSubElement"); . There is no reason to specify absolute XPaths queries here.

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Thanks, you're right of course when it comes to the example I gave. But what about when the XPath-root is actually lower than the document-root? I'm not sure how that can be but that's the case with the XMLNode I recieve from the webservice. –  Andreas Ågren Jan 19 '11 at 14:10
    
Can you provide a sample of your web service Xml? –  Sam B Jan 19 '11 at 14:12
    
I used the "Add Web Reference"-feature in VS2005 to auto-generate code for calling the webservice. This code calls System.Web.Services.Protocols.SoapHttpClientProtocol.Invoke(string, object[]) which returns object[] and then explicitly typecasts object[0] to XmlNode. Regarding the XML, I'm sorry but I can't show it here, but the document structure is <Data><SubElement><!-- other elements --></SubElement></Data>. However when running an XPath on it the root is /SubElement rather than, the expected, /Data (i.e. SelectSingleNode("/Data") returns null, but SelectSingleNode("/SubElement") works). –  Andreas Ågren Jan 19 '11 at 14:31
    
I'm still unsure as to why, in my case with the webservice, an absolute XPath doesn't begin at the same element as the document-element in OuterXml, but rather at a lower level. Anyway, thanks to both of you for the tip to use relative paths rather than absolute. –  Andreas Ågren Jan 19 '11 at 16:36
1  
Regarding SelectNode methods, I would say on the object you are querying. Keep in mind that you perform a SelectNode query to search for specific Children (of the current object). –  Sam B Jan 19 '11 at 17:13

This works:

XmlNode xnSubRoot = xd.SelectSingleNode("/root/subroot");
XmlNode xnElm = xnSubRoot.SelectSingleNode("elm");

And so does this:

XmlNode xnRoot = xd.SelectSingleNode("/root");
XmlNode xnElm = xnRoot.SelectSingleNode("subroot/elm");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, you're right of course when it comes to the example I gave. But what about when the XPath-root is actually lower than the document-root? I'm not sure how that can be but that's the case with the XMLNode I recieve from the webservice. –  Andreas Ågren Jan 19 '11 at 14:09
    
The XmlNode, which you receive, does not have a parent node and that causes the behaviour you are seeing. Each node works only with the structure shown by InnerXml property. If you want to achieve the same with your example, you can do xnSubRoot = xnSubRoot.CloneNode(true). It may not be the best solution but at least it seems to work. Still, I wonder why you want to use XPath queries that are based on the root (i.e. start with '/')? –  mgronber Jan 19 '11 at 14:46

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