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I would like to have a short example on how do you actually perform relationships in Entity Framework 4 Code-First CTP 5 ?

Would love an example for these kind of relations :

* one-to-many
* many-to-many

Thanks a lots!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

One to One

public class One
{
  public int Id {get;set;}
  public virtual Two RelationTwo {get;set;}
}

public class Two
{
 public int Id {get;set;}
 public virtual One RelationOne {get;set;}
}

Things to note, it has to be virtual

One to Many

public class One
{
  public int Id {get;set;}
  public virtual ICollection<Two> RelationTwo {get;set;}
}

public class Two
{
 public int Id {get;set;}
 public virtual One RelationOne {get;set;}
}

Many to Many

public class One
{
  public int Id {get;set;}
  public virtual ICollection<Two> RelationTwo {get;set;}
}

public class Two
{
 public int Id {get;set;}
 public virtual ICollection<One> RelationOne {get;set;}
}

note that it needs to be ICollection

Following links maybe helpful, click and click

Hope this helps.

EDIT

Updated to include one to many.

EDIT #2

Updated to include a potential for doing the Invoice <-> Product scenario which was requested by comment.

note: this is untested, but should put you in the right direction

public class Invoice
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    //.. etc. other details on invoice, linking to shipping address etc.

    public virtual ICollection<InvoiceProduct> Items {get;set;}
}

public class InvoiceProduct
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public int Quantity {get;set;}
    public decimal Price {get;set;} // possibly calculated
    //.. other details such as discounts maybe

    public virtual Product Product {get;set;}
    public virtual Invoice Order {get;set;} // maybe but not required
}

public class Product
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    //.. other details about product
}

Using this you could then iterate through all the items on the invoice and then foreach be able to show the invoice details about each item as well as a description from the product itself.

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2  
I don't believe they need to be virtual (but I do highly recommend making them virtual). If they are not marked as virtual, the relationship will still exist, but EF will not use lazy loading and will only load the other side of the relationship if the corresponding entity has been loaded into the session. Also, for one-to-many, which how to do it can be inferred by your answer, does not need references on both sides, though it may make sense depneding on the needs of the application. –  Brian Ball Jan 19 '11 at 14:06
1  
Just another link you make be interested in, I found it to be a fairly useful intro to code first: weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2010/07/16/… –  Manatherin Jan 19 '11 at 14:11
    
Thanks for the answer so far. One more thing. IF its in a Bill context where your invoice have item line. That would involve a relationship table. How do you proceed with this scenario ? –  Rushino Jan 19 '11 at 14:41
    
Updated to add 1 to many - @Rushino can you expan the scenario you mention above a bit more please? –  WestDiscGolf Jan 19 '11 at 19:58
    
Ok. I will put you in a billing context. You have an invoice (First entity). The invoice include products (Second entity) but there are Lines on the invoice which include the quantity of products you bought. There is obviously a relationship table which include IdLine, IdInvoice, IdProduct and Quantity. How can you do this scenario using EF4 Code-First ? –  Rushino Jan 19 '11 at 22:54

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