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I'm developing an Android app which uses SSLSocket to connect to a server. This is the code I'm using:

            // Connect
         if (socket == null || socket.isClosed() || !socket.isConnected()) {
          if (socket != null && !socket.isClosed())
           socket.close();
          Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Connecting...");
          if (sslContext == null) {
           sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
           sslContext.init(null, trustAllCerts, new SecureRandom()); 
          }
          SSLSocketFactory socketFactory = sslContext.getSocketFactory();
                socket = (SSLSocket)socketFactory.createSocket(host, port);
                socket.setSoTimeout(20000);
                socket.setUseClientMode(true);
                connected = true;
                Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Connected.");
         }

         // Secure
         if (connected) {
          Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Securing...");
                SSLSession session = socket.getSession();
                secured = session.isValid();
                if (secured) {
                 Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Secured.");
                }
                else
                 Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Securing failed.");
         }

The problem is that it takes about 5 seconds or event more to do the TLS handshake in the line below:

SSLSession session = socket.getSession();

I have made a similar iPhone app, the handshake takes just 1 second there, so I think the problem is not in the server I'm connecting to, it's maybe in the code above. The connection itself is fast enough, just the TLS handshake is slow. Does anybody know if its normal in Android, or if it is not, how to make it faster?

Thank you.

EDITED on 21.01.11:

I have found out, that the handshake is fast when I connet to another server, for example paypal.com:443. But I had been connecting to another server before - a .NET service written by me. As I had said before, I did not think the problem was in that server because if I connect to it with my iPhone App the handshake is fast. Now I don't know why it is fast on iPhone and slow on Android. After the connection is established, the only thing I do in the .NET server is:

Console.WriteLine("New client connected.");
            this.sslStream = new SslStream(tcpClient.GetStream(), true);
            this.sslStream.ReadTimeout = 15000;
            this.sslStream.WriteTimeout = 15000;

            Console.WriteLine("Beginning TLS handshake...");
            this.sslStream.AuthenticateAsServer(connection.ServerCertificate, false, SslProtocols.Tls, false);
            Console.WriteLine("TLS handshake completed.");
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4 Answers 4

I have done something similar to this and it is slower than an unsecured connection. Granted my case was https vs http and it is a little different the SSL/TLS factor will add slowness to the deal.

I have two identical apps that comunicate with the same protocol to the same server, one in android and one in iPhone, both using https. When I tested them both in http I would see more or less the same response time, in https iOS was slightly faster in my case, but not terribly.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I know that TLS is generally slower than a pure connection, but its fast enough. The TLS handshake however is very slow, it takes 10 seconds, not 5 as I had said before. –  Arthur Jan 20 '11 at 8:48

You are using a new SecureRandom per connection, instead of using a single static pre-initialized SecureRandom. Everytime you create a new SecureRandom(), you need to gather entropy for seeding (a slow process).

SecureRandom does not self-seed until it is first used, which is why the delay does not occur until the call to getSession()

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply Jumbogram, I have tried what you said, now I'm using only one instance of SecureRandom which is initialized in the constructor. But no matter how often I connect and disconnect, it takes always about 10 seconds to execute socket.getSession(); –  Arthur Jan 20 '11 at 8:52
    
If it were me, I'd try to get a packet capture and look at where the slow down is. Is it 1 second between every packet? Is there a long delay between packet (n) and (n+1), but everything else quick? Things like this. –  Jumbogram Jan 21 '11 at 0:50
    
Good idea, I will try it. I have found out, that the handshake is fast when I connet to another server, for example paypal.com:443. I have edited my post now, I think I have to change something in the .NET server but I don't know what, maybe the problem is in the server's certificate, no idea.. –  Arthur Jan 21 '11 at 12:17
    
Thanks that actually cut our request time by the half, but I guess it would be not to bad regenerating the Secure Random after a random time! –  joecks Jan 4 '12 at 15:01

The problem is most likely in the way the device validates server certificates. Validation can involve contacting third-party for CRLs and OCSP responses. If this happens, it takes time. iPhone probably just doesn't do this (at least by default) which is a security hole BTW.

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There was a bug on earlier versions of the Android SDK. Apparently, it's doing an unnecessary DNS reverse lookup. You need to prevent this from happening. Here's a workaround that worked for me. It used to take 15 seconds, now it takes 0-1 seconds. Hope it helps.

Here's the link to the Google issue.

            boolean connected = false;
            if (socket == null || socket.isClosed() || !socket.isConnected()) {
            if (socket != null && !socket.isClosed()) {
                socket.close();
            }

            Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Connecting...");
            messages.getText().append("Connecting...");
            final KeyStore keyStore = KeyStore.getInstance("BKS");
            keyStore.load(getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.serverkey), null);

            final KeyManagerFactory keyManager = KeyManagerFactory.getInstance(KeyManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
            keyManager.init(keyStore, null);
            //keyManager.init(null, null);

            final TrustManagerFactory trustFactory = TrustManagerFactory.getInstance(TrustManagerFactory.getDefaultAlgorithm());
            trustFactory.init(keyStore);

            sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
            sslContext.init(keyManager.getKeyManagers(), trustFactory.getTrustManagers(), rnd);
            final SSLSocketFactory delegate = sslContext.getSocketFactory();
            SocketFactory factory = new SSLSocketFactory() {
                @Override
                public Socket createSocket(String host, int port)
                        throws IOException, UnknownHostException {
                    InetAddress addr = InetAddress.getByName(host);
                    injectHostname(addr, host);
                    return delegate.createSocket(addr, port);
                }
                @Override
                public Socket createSocket(InetAddress host, int port)
                        throws IOException {
                    return delegate.createSocket(host, port);
                }
                @Override
                public Socket createSocket(String host, int port, InetAddress localHost, int localPort)
                        throws IOException, UnknownHostException {
                    return delegate.createSocket(host, port, localHost, localPort);
                }
                @Override
                public Socket createSocket(InetAddress address, int port, InetAddress localAddress, int localPort)
                        throws IOException {
                    return delegate.createSocket(address, port, localAddress, localPort);
                }
                private void injectHostname(InetAddress address, String host) {
                    try {
                        Field field = InetAddress.class.getDeclaredField("hostName");
                        field.setAccessible(true);
                        field.set(address, host);
                    } catch (Exception ignored) {
                    }
                }
                @Override
                public Socket createSocket(Socket s, String host, int port, boolean autoClose) throws IOException {
                    injectHostname(s.getInetAddress(), host);
                    return delegate.createSocket(s, host, port, autoClose);
                }
                @Override
                public String[] getDefaultCipherSuites() {
                    return delegate.getDefaultCipherSuites();
                }
                @Override
                public String[] getSupportedCipherSuites() {
                    return delegate.getSupportedCipherSuites();
                }
            };
            socket = (SSLSocket)factory.createSocket("192.168.197.133", 9999);
            socket.setSoTimeout(20000);
            socket.setUseClientMode(true);
            connected = true;
            Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Connected.");
            messages.getText().append("Connected.");
        }

        // Secure
        if (connected) {
            Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Securing...");
            messages.getText().append("Securing...");
            SSLSession session = socket.getSession();
            boolean secured = session.isValid();
            if (secured) {
                Log.i(getClass().toString(), "Secured.");
                messages.getText().append("Secured.");
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I have been looking everywhere for a way to do this (not even android related, just needed to disable reverse DNS lookups in a java project). I had to modify it for the latest JDK -- they put the hostName one level deeper inside of an InetAddressHolder wrapper class (also inaccessible, needed more reflection to traverse that). Still - thank you. –  Chris Sep 17 '13 at 20:10
    
Thank you Yuyo. the problem has troubled me for a long time. –  SalutonMondo Jul 4 at 7:01

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