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There are many questions SO asking how to detect IDisposable objects leak. It seems like the answer is "you can't".

I just checked with the most trivial test case, that FxCop 10.0 doesn't do it, ReSharper 4 with MSVS2010 doesn't do it.

This seems wrong to me, worse than memory leaks in C (for which at least we have established tools to detect).

I was thinking: Is it possible, using reflection and other obscure advanced techniques, that I can inject a check at runtime, in the finalizer to see whether Dispose has been called?

How about magic tricks with WinDBG+SOS?

Even if there aren't existing tools to do it, I'd like to know whether this is theoretically possible (my C# isn't very sharp).

Ideas?

NOTE This question's title might have been misleading. The real question here should be whether a IDisposable object has been Disposed() properly. Getting disposed by the GC doesn't count since I regard that as a mistake.

Edit: Solution: .NET Memory Profiler does the job. We just need to spam several GC.Collect() at the end of the program to enable our profiler to correctly pick up the stats.

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The reason why tools exist for C++ but maybe not for C# is that resources in C# are fundamentally different since unmanaged resources are no longer coupled to object lifetime. What can be traced, both in C# and in C++, is object lifetime and whether an object has been properly disposed of. But disposable resources in C# are not in any way bound to object lifetime which makes tracking them much harder. For comparison, try tracking leaked GDI resources that are not bound via RAII to object lifetime in C++. Not as easy either. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 19 '11 at 16:23
    
I have been pondering this a bit. I developed a habit of quickly checking types as I write code to see if they inherit from IDisposable. If they do I wrap them in using at the scope they need to live. It does nothing for existing code but I just thought I'd mention it. –  Nick Strupat Oct 31 '11 at 19:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You didn't search hard enough. There are plenty of .NET Memory Profilers out there that will look at your program as it runs and let you know where/how your memory is used (and what is leaking it).

I would check out any of the following:

Microsoft's CLR Memory Profiler (free)
RedGate ANTS Memory Profiler
JetBrain's DotTrace (includes code profiler as well)
SciTech .NET Memory Profiler

Update

SciTech's .NET Memory Profiler has a feature called 'Dispose Tracker' that fits the bill for the OP's request of tracking only the Dispose calls in their application.

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Does that detect Dispose or just memory? What if my IDisposable object just has Console.WriteLine("baz"); (poor example, I know, but you get the point) and I want to make sure it's actually called NOT by the GC? –  kizzx2 Jan 19 '11 at 15:31
    
@kizzx2 - It will detect everything, but from there you can narrow it down to find what you're looking for. –  Justin Niessner Jan 19 '11 at 15:31
    
I had best experiences with RedGate's ANTS Memory Profiler. –  Uwe Keim Jan 19 '11 at 15:46
    
@Uwe Keim: does RedGate's ANTS Memory Profiler track what the question actually asked? (That's the only one in the list that requires sending email for evaluation -- too lazy to do that right now) –  kizzx2 Jan 19 '11 at 16:02
2  
.NET Memory Profiler happens to has this feature called "Dispose Tracker" that does exactly what I wanted. Unfortunately this answer as it stands now is not really useful to anyone because it just lists out Google search results (not that it is that not useful -- it forced me to go down and try each of them to prove that at least one is relevant). Can you edit it to at least include "Dispose Tracker" about .NET Memory Profiler so this is at least informative? –  kizzx2 Jan 19 '11 at 16:11

you can do it, by adding a Finalizer to your IDisposable objects. In the finalizer, you can check whether the object has been disposed or not. If it hasn't been disposed, you can assert this, or write something to a log, or whatever.

 ~Disposable()
 {
#if DEBUG
            // In debug-builds, make sure that a warning is displayed when the Disposable object hasn't been
            // disposed by the programmer.

            if( _disposed == false )
            {
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.Fail ("There is a disposable object which hasn't been disposed before the finalizer call: {0}".FormatString (this.GetType ().Name));
            }
#endif
            Dispose (false);
 }

You can factor this functionality into a base class -Disposable- for instance, which can be used as a template to implement the Disposable pattern for instance.

Like this, for instance:

    /// <summary>
    /// Abstract base class for Disposable types.    
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>This class makes it easy to correctly implement the Disposable pattern, so if you have a class which should
    /// be IDisposable, you can inherit from this class and implement the DisposeManagedResources and the
    /// DisposeUnmanagedResources (if necessary).
    /// </remarks>
    public abstract class Disposable : IDisposable
    {
        private bool                    _disposed = false;

        /// <summary>
        /// Releases the managed and unmanaged resources.
        /// </summary>
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose (true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize (this);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Releases the unmanaged and managed resources.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">When disposing is true, the managed and unmanaged resources are
        /// released.
        /// When disposing is false, only the unmanaged resources are released.</param>
        [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage ("Microsoft.Design", "CA1063:ImplementIDisposableCorrectly")]
        protected void Dispose( bool disposing )
        {
            // We can suppress the CA1063 Message on this method, since we do not want that this method is 
            // virtual.  
            // Users of this class should override DisposeManagedResources and DisposeUnmanagedResources.
            // By doing so, the Disposable pattern is also implemented correctly.

            if( _disposed == false )
            {
                if( disposing )
                {
                    DisposeManagedResources ();
                }
                DisposeUnmanagedResources ();

                _disposed = true;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Override this method and implement functionality to dispose the 
        /// managed resources.
        /// </summary>
        protected abstract void DisposeManagedResources();

        /// <summary>
        /// Override this method if you have to dispose Unmanaged resources.
        /// </summary>
        protected virtual void DisposeUnmanagedResources()
        {
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Releases unmanaged resources and performs other cleanup operations before the
        /// <see cref="Disposable"/> is reclaimed by garbage collection.
        /// </summary>
        [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage ("Microsoft.Design", "CA1063:ImplementIDisposableCorrectly")]
        ~Disposable()
        {
#if DEBUG
            // In debug-builds, make sure that a warning is displayed when the Disposable object hasn't been
            // disposed by the programmer.

            if( _disposed == false )
            {
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.Fail ("There is a disposable object which hasn't been disposed before the finalizer call: {0}".FormatString (this.GetType ().Name));
            }
#endif
            Dispose (false);
        }
    }
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2  
I don't think this is a poor approach. In fact, I think it is a far superior approach than using a profiler for something so simple to implement. The only downside with this is that it can't check other people's classes, so a profiler is still needed. But why not opt for an easier way out when you have control over adding a Debug.Assert in your finalizer? Do you really enjoy running the program in a profiler all the time just to catch some careless mistakes? I wonder what kind of software development can make this trivial approach "far too much clutter and complex" in comparison :P –  kizzx2 Jan 20 '11 at 14:24
2  
Finalizers introduce performance penalties, which may not be acceptable given the implied goals of the question. Jeffrey Richter's CLR via C# 2nd Edition (p. 477) points out that objects with finalizers take longer to allocate, get promoted to older generations (so they are collected later), and require extra processing at collection time. –  Neil Whitaker Jun 9 '11 at 16:59
2  
@Neil Whitaker is correct. See Framework Design Guidelines 2nd Ed. pp. 329-330. "AVOID making types finalizable." Quoting Joe Duffy, "On a heavily loaded server, you may find that one processor spends 100 percent of its time just running finalizers." –  TrueWill Aug 25 '11 at 17:48
1  
@kizzx2 - finalizers are not inevitable. Most IDisposable classes do not need a finalizer. For many of the rest, SafeHandle descendants will suffice. Read Microsoft's guidelines on this topic. –  TrueWill Aug 26 '11 at 1:41
2  
@kizzx2 - but the sample code shows the #if DEBUG inside the finalizer, and the answer suggests using this "as a template to implement the Disposable pattern". –  TrueWill Aug 26 '11 at 2:43

While @Justin Niessner's recommendation works, I find that using a full blown profiler too heavy.

I created my home-brew solution: EyeDisposable. It instruments assemblies to detect when Dispose have not been called.

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