Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

dear developers I have some problems with Rails models Here is my sql tables

  create_table "areas", :primary_key => "ndc", :force => true do |t|
    t.string "townname", :limit => 256, :null => false
  end

  create_table "books", :primary_key => "ndc", :force => true do |t|
    t.integer "booked", :null => false
    t.integer "free",   :null => false
  end



class Book < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.primary_key = "ndc"
  has_one :area, :foreign_key => 'ndc'
end

class Area < ActiveRecord::Base
    self.primary_key = "ndc"
    belongs_to :book , :foreign_key => 'ndc'
end

in controller I have such code

   @books = Book.paginate :page => params[:page] || 1, :per_page => 10
     @books.each do |booking|
      p booking.area
      p booking

     end

In production mode doesn't work, booking.area is nil object. what it can be ?

Area becames nil if config.cache_classes = true

so booking.area generates such queries if cashe_classes = true
SELECT areas.* FROM areas WHERE (areas.ndc = NULL) LIMIT 1 but without cashing classes SELECT areas.* FROM areas WHERE (areas.ndc = 30) LIMIT 1

FIXED by removing belongs_to :book , :foreign_key => 'ndc' from area class.

share|improve this question
    
I added self.primary_key = "ndc" to Book class and association seems to be working now. Thank you –  Fivell Jan 19 '11 at 15:52
1  
Yes, any time you use a name other than "id" for your primary key field, you must insert a statement in your ActiveRecord class specifying that primary key. –  Dylan Markow Jan 19 '11 at 15:58
    
ok I updated my question –  Fivell Feb 1 '11 at 10:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your areas table needs a book_id integer field to match against the books table's primary key.

share|improve this answer
    
thnks , in this case books must have area_id , but if not , I can't use association if I ovveride foreign_key? –  Fivell Jan 19 '11 at 15:43
    
You can do that, but then the has_one statement should be in your Area class and the belongs_to should be in your Book class (the class with the belongs_to statement is expected to have the XXX_id field referencing the has_one class). Also, you may actually want the Areas class to have a has_many statement, not a has_one statement -- assuming that multiple books can belong to an area? –  Dylan Markow Jan 19 '11 at 15:46
    
I understood that , thnks. Question is next: is there no way to associate them by ndc field without creating additional column ?? –  Fivell Jan 19 '11 at 15:48
    
Do you mean that if a book's ndc is 4, it should be matched up with the area whose ndc is 4? If that's the case, why have two separate tables? –  Dylan Markow Jan 19 '11 at 15:53
    
because i have 5k records in area table and only few records in book table, but all area table is used in other logic –  Fivell Jan 19 '11 at 19:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.