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I am trying to use a subquery that returns a comma delimited string in a IN clause. The following way:

SELECT p.person_id, g.name || '>>' || p.firstname || ' ' || p.lastname as GROUP_PATH
FROM PERSON p 
LEFT JOIN GROUP g ON (
    g.group_id = p.group_id
)
WHERE p.person_id IN ( 
    SELECT person_ids FROM other WHERE other_id = :OTHER_ID
) 
ORDER BY lower(GROUP_PATH) 

And I am getting the following error: ORA-01722: invalid number.

Is there a better way to do this or even possible?

share|improve this question
    
Can you show the table definition (particularly the id column types) for all three tables; and how :other_id is defined? You may be joining a number column to a varchar that you think only has numbers, or only matches on numbers, and it's tripping over a non-numeric value you aren't expecting to be relevant. –  Alex Poole Jan 19 '11 at 16:11
    
I just noticed that my initial query was wrong. I updated it. –  Kel Jan 19 '11 at 16:15

2 Answers 2

The most obvious explanation is that you are trying to do math with a string...

The attempted conversion of a character string to a number failed because the character string was not a valid numeric literal. Only numeric fields or character fields containing numeric data may be used in arithmetic functions or expressions. Only numeric fields may be added to or subtracted from dates.

http://ora-01722.ora-code.com/

Update #1:

Your description worries me:

I am trying to use a subquery that returns a comma delimited string in a IN clause.

Your subquery should not return a comma delimited string (unless g.group_id is a string and expects a comma delimited string). You must retrieve individual items in as many rows as needed (less than 1,000 anyway).

Update #2:

Just to make it clear:

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT 1 AS FOO_ID FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 2 FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 3 FROM DUAL
) FOO;

FOO_ID                 
---------------------- 
1                      
2                      
3  

You can do this:

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT 1 AS FOO_ID FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 2 FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 3 FROM DUAL
) FOO
WHERE FOO_ID IN (1, 2);

FOO_ID                 
---------------------- 
1                      
2 

But not this:

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT 1 AS FOO_ID FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 2 FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 3 FROM DUAL
) FOO
WHERE FOO_ID IN ('1,2');

SQL Error: ORA-01722: invalid number

Because you cannot compare number 1 with string '1,2'. Subqueries follow similar rules:

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT 1 AS FOO_ID FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 2 FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 3 FROM DUAL
) FOO
WHERE FOO_ID IN (
    SELECT 1 AS FOO_ID FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 2 FROM DUAL
);

FOO_ID                 
---------------------- 
1                      
2 

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT 1 AS FOO_ID FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 2 FROM DUAL UNION SELECT 3 FROM DUAL
) FOO
WHERE FOO_ID IN (
    SELECT '1,2' AS FOO_ID FROM DUAL
);

SQL Error: ORA-01722: invalid number
share|improve this answer
    
When I only query the subquery and paste the results (comma delimited) into the IN clause it works fine. Any explanation for that? –  Kel Jan 19 '11 at 16:06
1  
Let's say you get '10,20,30'. What do you do with it? g.group_id IN (10,20,30) (three numbers) or g.group_id IN ('10,20,30') (one string)? –  Álvaro G. Vicario Jan 19 '11 at 16:08
    
I noticed that I rewrote the query wrong. Check it out now. I am supposed to get multiple person_ids and not group_ids. –  Kel Jan 19 '11 at 16:14
    
Doesn't really matter; are the multiple IDs returned as a string? –  Alex Poole Jan 19 '11 at 16:17
    
Yes, I'd say so, because the column person_ids is of the type varchar2. –  Kel Jan 19 '11 at 16:21

At a minimum, in order to reference the alias GROUP_PATH, you would need to need to use a nested subquery where the alias is defined before you reference it in your ORDER BY clause. That's realistically not causing the ORA-01722 error, but it is a problem

SELECT group_id, group_path
  FROM (SELECT g.group_id, 
               g.name || '>>' || p.firstname || ' ' || p.lastname as GROUP_PATH
          FROM PERSON p 
               LEFT JOIN GROUP g ON (
                      g.group_id = p.group_id
               )
         WHERE p.person_id IN ( 
               SELECT person_ids FROM other WHERE other_id = :OTHER_ID
               ) 
 ORDER BY lower(GROUP_PATH) 

If the PERSON_IDS column in the OTHER table is a comma separated list of values, your IN list is not going to do what you'd expect. You would need to transform the scalar string (that happens to have commas in it) into some sort of collection of multiple PERSON_ID values. There are various approaches to doing this, Tom Kyte has one example of using a variable IN list. Assuming you copy Tom's IN_LIST function, you should be able to do something like

SELECT group_id, group_path
  FROM (SELECT g.group_id, 
               g.name || '>>' || p.firstname || ' ' || p.lastname as GROUP_PATH
          FROM PERSON p 
               LEFT JOIN GROUP g ON (
                      g.group_id = p.group_id
               )
         WHERE p.person_id IN ( 
               SELECT column_value
                 FROM TABLE(SELECT in_list(person_ids) 
                              FROM other 
                             WHERE other_id = :OTHER_ID)
               ) 
 ORDER BY lower(GROUP_PATH) 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply Justin. I just noticed that I wrote the query wrong. Instead of getting a comma delimited string of group ids, I am getting comma delimited ids of persons. –  Kel Jan 19 '11 at 16:18
    
@Kel - Edited my queries to match –  Justin Cave Jan 19 '11 at 16:38

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