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I have a visual studio project that I need to setup in subversion. Here are some questions I would like help with please:

  1. What binary package to install for subversion. I see CollabNet,SlikSVN, Wandisco and Win32svn. I installed Win32svn but I'm not sure if this is the right one or not.
  2. Would like to install it on the server and have tortoisesvn as the client.
  3. the project I inherited has SVN files. What is the best way to add the project to SVN or import it.

Jamal

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

if you have .svn folders in your project already, it might be tied to a repository somewhere.

A good solution for hosting svn repositories in windows is visualSvn http://www.visualsvn.com/ they have a server and client. The client integrates with visual studio if that's how you prefer to work.

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+1 for the first sentence. – sbi Jan 19 '11 at 16:35

1.What binary package to install for subversion. I see CollabNet, SlikSVN, Wandisco and Win32svn. I installed Win32svn but I'm not sure if this is the right one or not.

Are you talking about a client or about a server? When last I searched for a Windows client, I found CollabNet and Slik. The former required registering, the latter didn't, so I used the latter. When I needed a server, either some sysadmin setup a machine with apache and all the whistles and bells, or I setup a machine using the free VisualSVN Server.

2.Would like to install it on the server and have tortoisesvn as the client.

Great. What is your question regarding this?

3.the project I inherited has SVN files. What is the best way to add the project to SVN or import it.

As NerdFury noticed, if the project has .svn files, it's already hosted in an SVN repository. To find out where that is, you can either use the SVN command line client (invoke svn info in the project's root folder) or TortoiseSVN (the SVN tab of the properties dialog of the root folder).

If you can't, or don't want to, use it, in order to import it you first need to get rid of the .svn folders. The common way is to svn export into the working copy, which (according to some answer here I cant find now) supposedly even works if the repository isn't available. Of course, importing from a working copy into a new repository discards the project's history.

If you have access to the old SVN repository, but still want/need to use your own, new repository, you can import the whole project, history and all, into a new repository.


Of course, before you do anything to that working copy, you should first make sure you have a backup.

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I can't recommend VisualSVN highly enough for integrating TortoiseSVN in to Visual Studio. It's not expensive and makes it a breeze.

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To answer some of the questions. I used the package from subversion.apache.org/packages.html which I thought was the server install. The setup uses a services instead of apache. If I install the VisualSVN, would that be the same except with a visual interface or is it different. – Jamal Jan 19 '11 at 18:16
    
@user581731, there are two Visual SVN products. The VisualSVN plug-in for Visual Studio (cheap!), and the actual SVN server (both available from that website). The SVN Server is free in a non-enterprise edition, which should be fine for your needs and wants. – Moo-Juice Jan 19 '11 at 19:00
    
Thanks everyone. This is my first post and I'm impressed. – Jamal Jan 19 '11 at 20:55

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