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In some code I'm working on, there are a couple of places where I do something like this:

public MyThread extends Thread{
    boolean finished = false;
    BlockingQueue<Foo> blockingQueue new LinkedBlockingQueue<Foo>();

    public void run(){
        while(!finished || (finished && !blockingQueue.isEmpty())){
            try{
                Foo f = blockingQueue.take();

                insertIntoDatabase(f);
            }
            catch(InterruptedException e){

            }
        }
    }

    public void insertThis(Foo f) throws InterruptedException{
        blockingQueue.put(f);
    }

    public void stop(){
        finished = true;
        this.interrupt();
    }
}

This, however, is causing problems as the thread is sometimes interrupted when it is in the insertIntoDatabase() method. As we're using Apache Derby, it throws a hissy fit (to wit: "java.sql.SQLException: Derby thread received an interrupt during a disk I/O operation, please check your application for the source of the interrupt."), and all subsequent database communication falls down in a nasty mess. Is there any tidy way to protect the thread from an interrupt when it's not waiting on the blocking queue, or alternatively to target the interrupt at the blocking queue?

Two solutions that I have seen suggested or have occurred to me are to insert a "poison pill" object into the queue to shut it down, and to have an extra boolean interruptsWelcome field that could be checked by the stop() method, but neither is particularly attractive to me - I'd either have to mess with the class hierarchy (Foo is not a trivial class) or produce masses of synchronisation code. Is there something neater?

share|improve this question
    
Are you saying the Apache code itself does not handle thread interruptions, and you want to block interruptions while the Apache code runs? Because I'd say that was a bug in the Apache code. –  Raedwald Jan 19 '11 at 16:52
    
I think it's a feature rather than a bug. It shows all signs of being recoverable - just the current connection is broken, but I don't want to have to open new connections when this is towards the end of the application's life cycle. –  Scott Jan 19 '11 at 20:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first thing you may want to do is to use an ExecutorService. In which you can use a single thread to submit the foo requests.

    class FooRunner{

     ExecutorService service = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

     //where RunnableFoo extends Foo and implements Runnable
        public void insertThis(RunnableFoo f) throws InterruptedException{ Run
            service.submit(f);
        }
        public void stop(){
            service.shutdown();
        }

    }

Your runnable itself can just ignore interrupted exception if you want

class RunnableFoo extends Foo implements Runnable{

 public void run(){
     try{
         insertIntoDatabase(this);
     }catch(InterruptedException ex){
       ex.printStackTrace();
     }
 }
}

Edit:

I saw your comment on the other answer and to answer that question in terms of using an ExecutorService. By having a singleThreadExeuctor you are restricting to one upload via thread-confinement. If only one thread is running within the service only one runnable will run at a time. The others will just queue up until the previous finished.

share|improve this answer
    
It rather looks like I've been caught unnecessarily re-inventing the wheel again. I thought I was being rather clever when I wrote MyThread. :-D Seems like ExecutorService is the way to go. Foo is already mostly Runnable - they used to all run as individual threads. –  Scott Jan 19 '11 at 20:38
    
Yea :) dont feel bad. A co-woker of mine tried to implement a synchronizer without the concept of conditions. The frustration on his face when I showed him what a CountdownLatch was –  John Vint Jan 19 '11 at 21:13
    
its almost as good as the answer I gave 3 hours earlier, ;) except submit() doesn't throw an InterruptedException, and as the poster says, insertIntoDatabase() doesn't throw it either (it gives a different exceptions) OP says Foo is a complex object so wrapping it is possibly better than extending it. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 20 '11 at 10:50

If all you want is not to allow thread interruption while running insertIntoDatabase(), factor out call to this method to separate Runnable and submit it to separate Executor:

    while(!finished || (finished && !blockingQueue.isEmpty())){
        try{
            final Foo f = blockingQueue.take();

            executor.submit(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    insertIntoDatabase(f);
                }
            });
        }
        catch(InterruptedException e){

        }
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
How do I synchronise on the Executor tasks so that a) only one object is being uploaded at a time and b) when the MyThread stops, we know that no more database interaction will occur? –  Scott Jan 19 '11 at 16:38
    
Scott: a) you can use Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor() to ensure sequential execution. b) from the code, when MyThread stops, it won't submit new tasks to executor. It can happen that last submitted task outlive MyThread, but it should be ok. Before return from MyThread.run() you can call ExecutorService.shutdown() to ensure last sumbitted task finished. –  Victor Sorokin Jan 19 '11 at 16:44

You could place sentinel value to stop processing. This doesn't require an interrupt or complex checking.

public class MyThread extends Thread{
    static final Foo STOP = new Foo();
    final BlockingQueue<Foo> queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Foo>();

    public void run(){
        try{
           Foo f = queue.take();
           while(f != STOP) {
              insertIntoDatabase(f);
              f = queue.take();
           }
        } catch(InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void insertThis(Foo f) {
        queue.add(f); // never fills up.
    }

    public void stop() {
        queue.add(STOP);
    }
}

Another way might be to use an ExecutorService.

public class DatabaseWriter {
   final ExecutorService es = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

   public void insertThis(final Foo f) {
       es.submit(new Runnable() {
           public void run() {
              insertIntoDatabase(f);
           }
       });
   }

   public void stop() {
       es.shutdown();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes, this is the best way to work with a BlockingQueue. –  jtahlborn Jan 19 '11 at 17:30
    
I understand the "poison pill" method, but it's not something I want to do. Foo is a fairly large class, and I'd rather not provide no-argument constructors and leave all the fields null. Maybe it's a phobia - I'm overly fond of immutable objects, too. ExecutorService looks like the way to go - after all, I seem to have been trying to more or less re-implement it. –  Scott Jan 19 '11 at 20:44
    
Its cleaner IMHO and you can mix/match what the background thread does or the number of threads easily. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 19 '11 at 21:21

Don't use this.interrupt() then. It seems it works as intended, but the JDBC driver is turning the InterruptedException into an SQLException, thus bypassing your exception handling.

Just set the finished boolean and wait for all I/O to complete.

share|improve this answer
    
If I just set finished to true, there is the possibility that it wouldn't ever finish if the thread was blocked at blockingQueue.take() and the blocking queue was already empty, with no more entries likely to arrive. Hence the interrupt. –  Scott Jan 19 '11 at 20:42
    
use poll(...) instead of take(). Gives you controlled finishing of the thread without interrupting important actions (like talking to the DB) –  Jochen Bedersdorfer Jan 19 '11 at 23:37
    
It also gives me a busy wait and a need for code to handle to case where poll() times out. –  Scott Jan 20 '11 at 8:58
    
Looks like you can't have your cake and eat it too. If you issue interrupt and a library like the JDBC driver decides to wrap this into a different exception, you either need to handle this exception and deal with the rollback in the DB or you have to wait for some actions to finish. If you want to guarantee that an item taken from the blocking queue has been handled, you can't issue interrupt. –  Jochen Bedersdorfer Jan 20 '11 at 17:18

Reading the finished variable should be enough, but only if it is volatile. Without volatile there's no guarantee the reading thread will ever see a write to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I forgot to add volatile to the example I gave, but, as I said to Jochen, finished isn't enough on its own - the thread will never get to read it if it's blocked in the blockingQueue.take() method because the BlockingQueue is empty. –  Scott Jan 20 '11 at 8:59
    
true that, you should then probably just take with a timeout and periodically check fishished –  Jed Wesley-Smith Jan 23 '11 at 23:47

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