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I've dug around SO for an answer to this, and the best one I can find so far is here, however that is geared toward instances with static constructors; I'm only using the class statically.

My code:

public static class MailHelper {

    private static string mailHost;

    static MailHelper() {

        var mailSettings = ConfigurationManager.GetSection("MailSettings") as NameValueCollection;
        if (null == mailSettings) {
            throw new ConfigurationErrorsException("Missing Mail Settings in the configuration file");
        }

        mailHost = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["mailHost"];
        if (null == mailHost) {
            throw new ConfigurationErrorsException("Missing mailHost setting in the configuration file");
        }

    }

    public static void SendMail(MailMessage Message) {
        ...
    }

}


try {
    MailHelper.SendMail(Message);
}
catch (ConfigurationErrorsException exc) {
    ...
}

//  ???    
MailHelper.SendMail(Message);


.

So if the static constructor throws an exception the first time it's called, what happens the second time I try to access the static SendMail() method?

TIA,
James

share|improve this question
    
It should fail, but what's wrong with trying it out for yourself? –  Pontus Gagge Jan 19 '11 at 16:31
    
I don't think it really makes sense to throw from a (static) constructor, because then the class is in an unstable state (not fully initialized). How about creating an explicit Init() function which you call before use (it should do nothing if already initialized), and if it throws an exception, don't use the class –  Cameron Jan 19 '11 at 16:36
    
Pontus> I thought Jon might need some more points : ) –  James King Jan 19 '11 at 16:52
3  
Cameron> I've never been a big fan of Init() methods... if Init() is required to make a class usable, why not just do it in the constructor? Otherwise you're passing control of your object to the caller, and you still have to test for validity in the called methods, because you can't trust that the caller did what he was supposed to. I like Chris' answer below, it sounds like a compromise between your approach and mine... set the config in the constructor, but don't throw exceptions, and check the settings in the static method instead. –  James King Jan 19 '11 at 16:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The other two answers are good answers to your direct question - here's a metaanswer - you should be throwing the exception in the method when you detect that the configuration elements are not populated, rather than in the constructor. IMHO, "not configured" is a valid configuration state for those elements at the constructor phase, just not at SendMail time. That will sidestep this whole problem.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, interesting perspective –  James King Jan 19 '11 at 16:45
    
Jon actually answered my question most correctly, but this answer proposes a better solution than the one I have. –  James King Jan 19 '11 at 18:22

Once a type initializer has failed once, it is never retried. The type is dead for the lifetime of the AppDomain. (Note that this is true for all type initializers, not just for types with static constructors. A type with static variables with initializer expressions, but no static constructors, can exhibit subtle differences in the timing of the type initializer execution - but it'll still only happen once.)

Demonstration:

using System;

public sealed class Bang
{
    static Bang()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("In static constructor");
        throw new Exception("Bang!");
    }

    public static void Foo() {}
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            try
            {
                Bang.Foo();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(e.GetType().Name);
            }
        }
    }
}

Output:

In static constructor
TypeInitializationException
TypeInitializationException
TypeInitializationException
TypeInitializationException
TypeInitializationException

As you can see, the static constructor is only called once.

share|improve this answer
4  
It's interesting that you catch only TypeInitializationExceptions when you explicitly throw Exception... does that Exception get swallowed? –  James King Jan 19 '11 at 16:42
6  
@James B: No, it's in the InnerException of the TypeInitializerException. –  Jon Skeet Jan 19 '11 at 17:05
2  
@James: No, you shouldn't be catching TypeInitializationException anywhere. That should only occur if a type is fatally broken, basically. –  Jon Skeet Jan 19 '11 at 18:33
2  
I think the takeaway from this is to not throw exceptions from within a Static Constructor, not to catch TypeInitialisationException everywhere, not to mess around with test AppDomains. If you have to start jumping through these weird hoops you've almost certainly missed something. The design of James' class clearly needs to change. –  Doctor Jones Feb 13 '13 at 9:45
4  
According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb386039.aspx ... it states: Throwing exceptions from a static constructor causes the type to be unusable in the current application domain. You should have a very good reason (such as a security issue) for throwing an exception from a static constructor. –  m-y Mar 29 '13 at 15:33

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