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Let's pretend I have 3 classes that each have exactly one responsibly (and method). Let's also pretend that these classes have interfaces to facilitate dependency injection. Class A calls the interface for class B and class B calls the interface for class C. If class C throws a NotAPrimeNumberException (if say, the int parameter isn't a prime number), I would expect to have a unit test that makes sure that C throws an NotAPrimeNumberException if the passed in parameter isn't a prime number. So far so good.

I'm currently under the belief that the unit tests provide all of the documentation I need to understand the behavior of the method being tested. So the aforementioned unit test would be something like MakeSureNotAPrimeNumberExceptionIsThrownIfNumberisNotPrimeTest().

Class B knows that class C can throw a NotAPrimeNumberException. If I want to let the NotAPrimeNumberException bubble up out of class B should I write a unit test for class B to somehow check that a NotAPrimeNumberException is thrown in some circumstances? What about Class A? If A also lets the NotAPrimeNumberException bubble up, should it also have a unit test for this?

My concern is that if I DON'T write a unit test in Class B then the consumers for class B won't be aware that class B can throw this type of exception. However, if I DO write the unit test then it is a little silly that I have to force the call to class B to throw a NotAPrimeNumberException only to NOT handle the exception in class B. If I don't write a unit test, what is the appropriate way, if any, to document in the API that this exception can occur?

The bonus question is how do you facilitate this in NUnit with Rhino-mocks? This is of course dependent upon the first two questions.

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Test should pass when the expected behavior happens. Even if that behavior is throwing an exception. –  Stefan H Jan 19 '11 at 17:19
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If classes A and B are expecting certain behaviors from the classes the collaborate with, then you should test to ensure these behaviors occur. If you want to avoid the huge ball of mud that you are heading for by having hardwired calls from A to B to C then you should apply the Hollywood Principle / DIP in order to break this dependency. A should depend on an IB (interface of B) not on an instance of B. Then tests of A can simply assert that A does what it's supposed to do, including acting properly in the face of exceptions thrown by IB (or ignoring them). Likewise, B can depend on an interface of C, IC, and tests of B can similarly ignore the details of what C might or might not do, instead focusing only on what B does.

An integration test that wires up A to B to C would be able to verify that the classes collaborate correctly, and would also be the place to ensure that an exception that is raised in C bubbles up from A if that is what you want to have happen. And if later it turns out that C simply returns null rather than raising an exception, then your integration test would fail and you would see that the new behavior had occurred. However, I wouldn't tend to clutter up my individual unit tests with tests showing that if things break the exception will bubble up since this is the default behavior. Instead I might test that any new exceptions I raise are thrown when expected, and that any handling of exceptions I perform works as I expect it to. This is because in a unit test you should only be testing your code under test - not the collaborators' behavior.

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Sorry, I just updated the comment to be a little bit clearer. I was just assuming that there were interfaces and dependency injection for mocking purposes but didn't say so in the question. The real point of my question is about writing a unit test for a method because a dependency throws an exception and whether this makes sense to help ensure that my unit tests document all of the behavior of my method. –  jakejgordon Jan 19 '11 at 18:58
    
You answered your question with your comment. Your unit tests should document "all of the behavior of my method" and not the behavior of methods your method might call. As long as you're doing that, you're good. If it's important whether or how your method handles exceptions bubbling up to it, it's easy (using mocks or fakes) to set up a test where an exception is thrown to your method, and to verify it does the right thing with it. If that's important behavior, it seems valid to me as a unit test. But mock the interaction, don't rely on a particular other method implementation. –  ssmith Jan 19 '11 at 19:38
    
My take is that it is important for the consumer of class B to know that you can get a NotAPrimeNumberException depending on the value you pass in for one of the parameters. Do you think using unit tests for documentation is a good enough reason to have a test for class B that is called something like ThrowsNotAPrimeNumberExceptionIfNotAPrimeNumberTest()? The test would just mock an exception coming from class C and make sure that class B throws the same exception. –  jakejgordon Jan 19 '11 at 20:01
    
If B throws a NotAPrimeNumberException in response to a given parameter, then I would absolutely have a test for this in my suite of tests around B. I would not try and test B's behavior through a consumer of B (such as A, assuming A calls B). In A, I might test what A does if B throws an exception - that's testing A's behavior. I would not test, in A, that B actually does throw an exception under certain circumstances, as that is now testing B's behavior, not A's (and we have tests around B for that). –  ssmith Jan 19 '11 at 20:25
    
Adding to last comment - if B is a third party or framework library, then you might write some "fixing" tests that document your assumptions about how it works, and then if/when you upgrade or replace B, you'll be informed by these tests if your assumptions about its behavior have changed. But the key point is that your unit tests should be testing your code, not the code your code depends on. –  ssmith Jan 19 '11 at 20:27
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Here are some thoughts:

  1. Class C is designed to throw a NotAPrimeNumberException. Therefore, you should have a test that verifies that the exception is thrown when expected.
  2. Whether or not you test Class B or A in this case depends on whether or not they do anything to handle the exception. If Class B needs to perform some action when Class C throws the exception, then you should test for that behavior. If Class B just lets that exception "pass through" then you shouldn't test for it. Otherwise you would also need to test behavior of NullReferenceException, ArithmeticOverflowException, HttpException and every other exception type. This is unit testing ad nausaeam and isn't helpful.
  3. On the issue of a Class C's behavior changing, you have a couple of things to consider. Any test that depends on the changed behavior should also be changed. (Since you're doing TDD you changed the tests before you changed the behavior, right?) Also, any mocks that emulate the exception-throwing behavior of Class C will also need to be changed. There's no use in testing what happens when Class C throws an exception if it never throws that exception. This last consideration is somewhat problematic and I don't know how it can be managed in a formal way. I'm interested in further thoughts.
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Sorry, I just updated the comment to be a little bit clearer. I was just assuming that there were interfaces and dependency injection for mocking purposes but didn't say so in the question. The real point of my question is about writing a unit test for a method because an exception throws a depedency and whether this makes sense to help ensure that my unit tests document all of the behavior of my method. I removed the question that you answered in bullet number 3 because the question wasn't very good :( –  jakejgordon Jan 19 '11 at 18:51
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You should use mocking for B and C and calls to their methods. This is the point of UNIT test - you only need to test a unit of code, not it's dependencies.

Puting that aside, if you don't want to use mocking in that case, I think that there should be no special conditions allowing it to pass if an exception is thrown in one of the dependencies. It should fail. First reason: the exact code you are testing doesn't actually work (you are testing it as a whole, with dependencies). Second reason: your tests get messy this way.

Remember to keep it simple.

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Sorry, I just updated the comment to be a little bit clearer. I was just assuming that there were interfaces and dependency injection for mocking purposes but didn't say so in the question. The real point of my question is about writing a unit test for a method because an exception throws a depedency and whether this makes sense to help ensure that my unit tests document all of the behavior of my method. –  jakejgordon Jan 19 '11 at 18:50
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If classes A and B don't really need to care about whether there is an exception, then you shouldn't unit test that functionality. If they have some specific behavior on that exception (perhaps they wrap it in a different exception or catch it and complain loudly with beeps), and you need to verify that behavior, then you should.

In the former case, I would make the decision not to unit test A and B in order to avoid making my tests fragile. If it isn't important that you verify the behavior of A and B in the face of a certain exception, then you don't want to tie those tests to the behavior of a different module.

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