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I'm working on an SQL stored procedure that is supposed to send an attachment with the results of a query.

I am using sp_send_dbmail to send the email.

Within the query I'd like to send, I join the to a table variable. When I executed the stored procedure, I got an error message which said that the variable didn't exist.

My code:

 DECLARE @t TABLE (
    id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    some fields
 )

DECLARE @query VARCHAR(MAX)
SET @query =  'SELECT 
    some values
 FROM @t t
  INNER JOIN dbo.Table d ON t.field = d.field
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail @recipients=@recipients_list,
        @subject = @subject,
        @query = @query,
        @attach_query_result_as_file = 1, 
        @query_result_width = 4000, 
        @query_attachment_filename = 'Details.txt'

Is there any way for me to refer to the local variable within this stored procedure? If not, why not?

TIA!

(I am using SQL Server 2005)

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The query runs in a different context than your original code body, so it is not aware of any local variables. Try using a global temp table instead.

CREATE TABLE ##t (
    id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    some fields
 )

DECLARE @query VARCHAR(MAX)
SET @query =  'SELECT 
    some values
 FROM ##t t
  INNER JOIN dbo.Table d ON t.field = d.field'
EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail @recipients=@recipients_list,
        @subject = @subject,
        @query = @query,
        @attach_query_result_as_file = 1, 
        @query_result_width = 4000, 
        @query_attachment_filename = 'Details.txt'

DROP TABLE ##t
share|improve this answer
    
why would using a temp table help? Aren't temp tables also in the context of my original code? – chama Jan 19 '11 at 19:30
    
@chama: Amended my answer. You'd want a global (two # signs) table. – Joe Stefanelli Jan 19 '11 at 19:35
    
Thanks. This is what I'd do in most situations, but I was able to find a simple work around that is specific to my query. – chama Jan 19 '11 at 19:42

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