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Initially I thought Math.Sign would be the proper way to go but after running a test it seems that it treats -0.0 and +0.0 the same.

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6  
What is negative zero and how is it different than positive zero and how is it different than zero? Mathematically their are the same. IEEE 754ically maybe not. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 19 '11 at 19:37
3  
@Darin Dimitrov, have you ever attended a mathematical analysis course? :P –  Federico Culloca Jan 19 '11 at 19:39
5  
@klez, yes I have. I even have a degree in mathematics :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 19 '11 at 19:40
5  
@abelenky: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_zero –  adrianbanks Jan 19 '11 at 19:45
3  
If you're talking about IEEE doubles, it is well defined. –  finnw Jan 19 '11 at 19:46

6 Answers 6

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Here's a grotty hack way of doing it:

private static readonly long NegativeZeroBits =
    BitConverter.DoubleToInt64Bits(-0.0);

public static bool IsNegativeZero(double x)
{
    return BitConverter.DoubleToInt64Bits(x) == NegativeZeroBits;
}

Basically that's testing for the exact bit pattern of -0.0, but without having to hardcode it.

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3  
It seems your solution is about 25 times faster than mine. –  ChaosPandion Jan 19 '11 at 20:00
    
As an added bonus, no additional overhead :) You have to love the power of unsafe code sometimes :) –  leppie Jan 19 '11 at 20:17
    
@leppie - Now this is awesome: return *(((long*) &value)); –  ChaosPandion Jan 19 '11 at 20:23
    
@ChaosPandion: Exactly :) –  leppie Jan 19 '11 at 20:24
11  
Had to look up "grotty" –  John Jan 19 '11 at 22:44

After a bit of searching I finally made it to Section 7.7.2 of the C# specification and came up with this solution.

private static bool IsNegativeZero(double x)
{
    return x == 0.0 && double.IsNegativeInfinity(1.0 / x);
}
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5  
While I applaud the ingenuity, I'm not sure it's the most readable approach :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 19 '11 at 19:46
1  
Actually, -1 - it thinks that -double.Epsilon is negative zero as well... –  Jon Skeet Jan 19 '11 at 19:47
    
@Jon - Dag nabbit –  ChaosPandion Jan 19 '11 at 19:48
1  
Curious that 1 / double.Epsilon would evaluate to infinity. –  Anthony Pegram Jan 19 '11 at 19:50
1  
@Anthony Pegram, not really. double.Epsilon is denormalized, so it is smaller than 2**(min exponent). There is no equivalent of denormalization for extremely large values, so the reciprocal is too large to be representable. –  finnw Jan 19 '11 at 19:55

Negative zero has the sign bit set. Thus:

    public static bool IsNegativeZero(double value) {
        if (value != 0) return false;
        int index = BitConverter.IsLittleEndian ? 7 : 0;
        return BitConverter.GetBytes(value)[index] == 0x80;
    }

Edit: as the OP pointed out, this doesn't work in Release mode. The x86 JIT optimizer takes the if() statement seriously and loads zero directly rather than loading value. Which is indeed more performant. But that causes the negative zero to be lost. The code needs to be de-tuned to prevent this:

    public static bool IsNegativeZero(double value) {
        int index = BitConverter.IsLittleEndian ? 7 : 0;
        if (BitConverter.GetBytes(value)[index] != 0x80) return false;
        return value == 0;
    }

This is quite typical behavior for the x86 jitter btw, it doesn't handle corner cases really well when it optimizes floating point code. The x64 jitter is much better in that respect. Although there's arguably no worse corner case than giving meaning to negative zero. Be forewarned.

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For some reason, when I build this with a target of x86 with optimizations enabled and run it outside of Visual Studio passing -0.0 will return false. Oh and this seems to be the middle ground performance wise. –  ChaosPandion Jan 19 '11 at 20:18
    
I repro, the if statement confuzzles the JIT optimizer. It now assumes the value equals zero, not negative zero and loads it directly with fldz rather than loading value. Because that's quicker. You are going to fight this badly in your own code as well. Post updated. –  Hans Passant Jan 19 '11 at 20:32
    
Unfortunately to fully implement the ECMAScript standard I must be aware of -0.0. –  ChaosPandion Jan 19 '11 at 21:15
    
I'm seeing standards collide head-on. Good luck with it. –  Hans Passant Jan 19 '11 at 21:32

Here's another hack. It takes advantage of the fact that Equals on a struct will do a bitwise comparison instead of calling Equals on its members:

struct Negative0
{
    double val;
    public static bool Equals(double d)
    {
        return new Negative0 { val = -0d }.Equals(new Negative0 { val = d });
    }
}

Negative0.Equals(0); // false
Negative0.Equals(-0.0); // true

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ValueType.Equals not always performs a bitwise comparison. And, unfortunately, exact conditions when it chooses to do so are undocumented, and may vary between CLR versions/platforms. –  Vladimir Reshetnikov Jul 23 '13 at 0:19
x == 0 && 1 / x < 0
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More generally, you can do,

bool IsNegative(double value)
{
    const ulong SignBit = 0x8000000000000000;
    return ((ulong)BitConverter.DoubleToInt64Bits(value) & SignBit) == SignBit;
}

or alternatively, if you prefer,

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
private struct DoubleULong
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public double Double;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public readonly ulong ULong;
}

bool IsNegative(double value)
{
    var du = new DoubleULong { Double = value };
    return ((du.ULong >> 62) & 2) == 2;
}

The later gives an approximate 50% performance improvment in debug but. Once compiled in release mode and run from the command line there is no significant difference.

I couldn't generate a performance improvement using unsafe code either but this may be due to my inexperience.

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