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I want to know shuffle string

Example string

string word;

//I want to shuffle it
word = "hello"  

I would be able to get:

rand == "ohlel"
rand == "lleho"
etc.
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9 Answers 9

You're looking for something like the Fisher–Yates shuffle. There's actually a Python example on that page:

import random

def shuffle(x):
    for i in reversed(range(1, len(x))):
        # pick an element in x[:i+1] with which to exchange x[i]
        j = random.randrange(i+1)
        x[i], x[j] = x[j], x[i]

Edit: Since your question is tagged both ironpython and c#, there's also a Java example there which is very easily converted to C#.

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C#:

string str = "hello";

// The random number sequence
Random num = new Random();

// Create new string from the reordered char array
string rand = new string(str.ToCharArray().
                OrderBy(s => (num.Next(2) % 2) == 0).ToArray());
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6  
This will not yield a good random result. According to MSDN OrderBy will use a stable sort and preserve the order for those characters that are given the same value. For the 'h' in "hello" to be put last, 'h' needs to roll 'false' and the rest 'true'. However the result will be "elloh", which is not very exciting. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb534966.aspx –  Nömmik Jan 19 '11 at 20:33

This solution (in a form of extension method) is nice:

    public static string  Shuffle(this string str)
    {
        char[] array = str.ToCharArray();
        Random rng = new Random();
        int n = array.Length;
        while (n > 1)
        {
            n--;
            int k = rng.Next(n + 1);
            var value = array[k];
            array[k] = array[n];
            array[n] = value;
        }
        return new string(array);
    }
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The best way to shuffle a string or a list of strings is using this way. Here you will get no duplicates:

class CardsDeck
{
    public static Random r = new Random();

    private static List<string> cards = new List<string>{ "♣ King", "♣ Queen", "♣ Jack", " ♣", "♣ 7", "♣ 8", "♣ 9", "♣ 10",
                                                          "♦ King", "♦ Queen", "♦ Jack", " ♦", "♦ 7", "♦ 8", "♦ 9", "♦ 10",
                                                          "♥ King", "♥ Queen", "♥ Jack", " ♥", "♥ 7", "♥ 8", "♥ 9", "♥ 10",
                                                          "♠ King", "♠ Queen", "♠ Jack", " ♠", "♠ 7", "♠ 8", "♠ 9", "♠ 10" };
    public string ReceiveCards()
    {
        if (cards.Count > 0)
        {
            int index = r.Next(cards.Count);
            var card = cards[index];
            cards.RemoveAt(index);
            return card;
        }
        else
        {
            return "";
        }
    }
}
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No, that is not the best way. Although it avoids duplicates, it's horribly inefficient. The Fisher-Yates shuffle mentioned elsewhere is a much better way to do it. –  Jim Mischel Dec 19 '14 at 21:49

You could try some thing like this..

class Program
{
    static bool IsPositionfilled(int Position, List<int> WordPositions)
    {
        return WordPositions.Exists(a => a == Position);
    }

    public static string shufflestring(string word)
    {
        List<int> WordPositions = new List<int>();
        Random r = new Random();
        string shuffledstring = null;
        foreach (char c in word)
        {
            while (true)
            {

                int position = r.Next(word.Length);
                if (!IsPositionfilled(position, WordPositions))
                {
                    shuffledstring += word[position];
                    WordPositions.Add(position);
                    break;
                }
            }


        }
        return shuffledstring;
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        string word = "Hel";
        Hashtable h = new Hashtable();
        for (int count = 0; count < 1000; count++)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1);
            string shuffledstring = shufflestring(word);
            if (h.Contains(shuffledstring))
                h[shuffledstring] = ((int)h[shuffledstring]) + 1;
            else
                h.Add(shuffledstring,1);
        }

        Console.WriteLine(word);
        foreach (DictionaryEntry e in h)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Key.ToString() + " , " + e.Value.ToString()); 
        }
    }
}
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inspired from tsql' order by newid()

static string shuffle(string input)
{
    var q = from c in input.ToCharArray()
            orderby Guid.NewGuid()
            select c;
    string s = string.Empty;
    foreach (var r in q)
        s += r;
    return s;
}
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I tried the old school way of doing it, this one works fine.

    static void Main()
    {        
        string input = "hello";
        string output = "";
        int ranIndex = 0;
        List<int> indexes = new List<int>();
        char[] split = input.ToCharArray();
        Random ran = new Random();

        for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++) 
        {
            ranIndex = ran.Next(0, input.Length);

            if (!indexes.Contains(ranIndex))
            {
                indexes.Add(ranIndex);
            }
            else 
            {
                i--;
            }
        }

        foreach (int value in indexes) 
        {
            output += split[value];
        }

            Console.WriteLine(output);
            Console.ReadLine();
    }
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why the down vote? –  Rye Feb 21 '13 at 3:55
class Program
{

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string word = "hello";
        string temp = word;
        string result = string.Empty;
        Random rand = new Random();

        for (int a = 0; a < word.Length; a++)
        {
            //multiplied by a number to get a better result, it was less likely for the last index to be picked
            int temp1 = rand.Next(0, (temp.Length - 1) * 3);

            result += temp[temp1 % temp.Length];
            temp = temp.Remove(temp1 % temp.Length, 1);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(result);
    }
}
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I accomplish this with this extension:

public static class Extensions{
    public static string Scramble(this string s){
        return new string(s.ToCharArray().OrderBy(x=>Guid.NewGuid()).ToArray());
    }
}
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