Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have code to access a SQLite table that works perfectly from my "main" activity. I'm trying to make the code more elegant by creating a separate class to handle data inserts, deletes, etc.

When I move the exact same code from the main activity to a separate class I get the following error:

The method openOrCreateDatabase(String, int, null) is undefined for the type BarCode

I notice that by extending my database class with "Activity" the error goes away. However, now I am getting NullPointerException when I run the code.

How would be the correct way to abstract database code and still be able to refer to it from an activity in Android?

Excuse me if I am getting the jargon wrong because I am a newbie to Android and Java.

Here is the full code:

package com.example.stockcontrol;

import java.util.Locale;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.ContentValues;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;

public class BarCode extends Activity {

 public BarCode() {

 }

 public void insertBarCode(String upc) {

  SQLiteDatabase db;
        db = openOrCreateDatabase(
         "StockControl.db"
         , SQLiteDatabase.CREATE_IF_NECESSARY
         , null
        );
        db.setVersion(1);
        db.setLocale(Locale.getDefault());
        db.setLockingEnabled(true);

        ContentValues mUpc = new ContentValues();
        mUpc.put("upc", "444");
        mUpc.put("description", "Box o toast");
        mUpc.put("scan_count", "1");
        db.insertOrThrow("tbl_upc", null, mUpc);

 }

}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than having your database class extend Activity, you should pass the relevant Context to the class. You can pass it in the constructor and keep a reference to the Context as a class variable.

public class BarCode {
    private final Context mContext;

    public BarCode(Context context) {
        mContext = context;
    }

    public void insertBarCode(String upc) {

     SQLiteDatabase db;
           db = mContext.openOrCreateDatabase(
            "StockControl.db"
            , SQLiteDatabase.CREATE_IF_NECESSARY
            , null
           );
           db.setVersion(1);
           db.setLocale(Locale.getDefault());
           db.setLockingEnabled(true);

           ContentValues mUpc = new ContentValues();
           mUpc.put("upc", "444");
           mUpc.put("description", "Box o toast");
           mUpc.put("scan_count", "1");
           db.insertOrThrow("tbl_upc", null, mUpc);

    }
}

To use the class, you would do this in your Activity:

BarCode barCode = new BarCode(this);
barCode.insertBarCode("123456");
share|improve this answer
    
@ccheneson Thanks for catching my copy&paste error! –  Ian G. Clifton Jan 19 '11 at 21:07
    
Also , the openOrCreateDatabase and setXXXX part would be better in a open method . If he wants to insert several rows, he wont need to go through the openOrCreateDatabase process every time –  ccheneson Jan 19 '11 at 21:12
    
You guys rock! Would you say this is a good method for achieving what I want to do or should I still stick with a data helper? –  Eugene van der Merwe Jan 19 '11 at 21:12
    
@Eugene: See developer.android.com/intl/fr/reference/android/content/…, int, android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase.CursorFactory) –  ccheneson Jan 19 '11 at 21:13

You can try passing the DB pointer to your mUpc routine.

mUpc.put(db,"upc","444");

You will have to rewrite the constructor of mUpc to accept the db object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply I will give that a shot as soon as I understand how to write a constructor to accept an object. In the meanwhile I have discovered the Notepad tutorial for Android here: developer.android.com/resources/tutorials/notepad/index.html I think I still have a lot to learn! –  Eugene van der Merwe Jan 19 '11 at 20:37

It seems the way to go about these things is to create a data helper. I followed this tutorial and now I can reference the database code from anywhere: http://www.screaming-penguin.com/node/7742

Edit: I found a much better tutorial, in fact, an excellent one from Google themselves that contains a number of best practices for doing this kind of thing including using a data adaptor to properly abstract database access. This is the Notebook Tutorial here: http://developer.android.com/resources/tutorials/notepad/index.html

share|improve this answer
    
Data helper is the way to go –  ccheneson Jan 19 '11 at 21:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.