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I've been stucked on this question for a really long time. I've managed to do a single recursive factorial.

def factorial(n):
     if n == 0:
         return 1
     else:
         return n * factorial(n-1)

Double factorial For an even integer n, the double factorial is the product of all even positive integers less than or equal to n. For an odd integer p, the double factorial is the product of all odd positive integers less than or equal to p.

If n is even, then n!! = n*(n - 2)*(n - 4)*(n - 6)* ... *4*2

If p is odd, then p!! = p*(p - 2)*(p - 4)*(p - 6)* ... *3*1

But I have no idea to do a double factorial. Any help?

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Look at what changes between the two: the n-1 becomes n-2 and the final number (bases case) changes from 0 to one of 2 or 1. –  marcog Jan 19 '11 at 20:13
    
When I saw this question I did a double take. –  GregS Jan 20 '11 at 1:33

8 Answers 8

reduce(int.__mul__,range(n,0,-2))
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2  
+1 for making it completely obfuscated! –  Blender Jan 19 '11 at 20:16
2  
Wait, this gets actually upvoted? At least use operator.mul (somewhat cleaner, as you don't type underscores, and is "type-agnostic"). And I for one would prefer the explicitly iterative version anyway, if I was to avoid stack overflows (and mentioned below, that's not the point of most factorial assignments). –  delnan Jan 19 '11 at 20:24
1  
Also the point of any factorial function is to teach people recursion, not actually being efficient. And you'll find xrange is even more efficient. ;) –  Lennart Regebro Jan 19 '11 at 20:24
1  
@delnan: Since range only yields int, using int.__mul__ is alright(And don't have to do another importing). @Lennart Regebro: True. However I wrote this code in Python 3. As for the recursion usage, don't you think the the reduce can be considered as a recursion function? Understanding it could be a help. –  Kabie Jan 19 '11 at 20:42
3  
reduce(long.__mul__,range(n,0,-2),1L) avoids problem when the product gets too big –  John La Rooy Jan 20 '11 at 9:55

Isn't that just the same as the factorial with a different ending condition and a different parameter to the recursion call?

def doublefactorial(n):
     if n <= 0:
         return 1
     else:
         return n * doublefactorial(n-2)

If n is even, then it will halt when n == 0. If n is odd, then it will halt when n == -1.

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2  
You'll want to call doublefactorial in the recursive call. Made the same mistake. –  Ktash Jan 19 '11 at 20:16
    
You can halt at 1 instead of -1. I know, minimal improvement, but still. :) –  Lennart Regebro Jan 19 '11 at 20:17
    
Haha yes, of course. :-) –  CanSpice Jan 19 '11 at 20:17
def double_fact(number):
    if number==0 or number==1:
        return 1
    else:
        return number*double_fact(number-2)

I think this should work for you.

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def doublefactorial(n):
     if n in (0, 1):
         return 1
     else:
         return n * doublefactorial(n-2)

should do it.

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I hope I understand it correctly, but will this work

 def factorial(n):
 if n == 0 or n == 1:
     return 1
 else:
     return n * factorial(n-2)
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite. You need to adjust the base case, otherwise it doesn't terminate for odd numbers. –  delnan Jan 19 '11 at 20:18
    
You'd need to stop at less then 0 otherwise an odd value will go into an infinite loop (or eventually hit a stackoverflow) –  Ktash Jan 19 '11 at 20:18
    
O yes I see it now. –  Navi Jan 19 '11 at 20:20

reduce(lambda x,y: y*x, range(n,1,-2))

Which is basically the same as the simple iterative version:

x = n
for y in range(n-2, 1, -2):
    x*=y

Obviously you can also do it recursively, but what's the point ? This kind of example implemented using recursivity are fine when using all recursive languages, but with imperative language it's always making simple tools like recursivity looking more complex than necessary, while recursivity can be a real simplifier when dealing with fundamentally recursive structures like trees.

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def doublefactorial(n):
     if n <= 0:
         return 1
     else:
         return n * doublefactorial(n-2)

That should do it. Unless I'm misunderstanding

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Why are you returning 2 for n == 0? it should be 1, just use if n <= 1: return 1, though really it should be if n < 0: scream loudly if n in (0, 1): return 1 –  wich Jan 20 '11 at 10:54
    
Ah, good catch. You're right. –  Ktash Jan 21 '11 at 21:31

My version of the recursive solution, in one line:

dfact = lambda n: (n <= 0) or n * dfact(n-2)

However, it is also interesting to note that the double factorial can be expressed in terms of the "normal" factorial. For odd numbers,

n!! = (2*k)! / (2**k * k!)

where k = (n+1)/2. For even arguments n=2k, although this is not consistent with a generalization to complex arguments, the expression is simpler,

n!! = (2k)!! = 2*k * k!.

All this means that you can write code using the factorial function from the standard math library, which is always nice:

import math
fact = math.factorial
def dfact(n):
  if n % 2 == 1:
    k = (n+1)/2
    return fact(2*k) / (2**k * fact(k))
  else:
    return 2**k * fact(k)

Now, this code is obviously not very efficient for large n, but it is quite instructive. More importantly, since we are dealing with standard factorials now, it is a very good starting point for optimizations when dealing with really large numbers. Once could try to use logarithms or gamma functions to get approximate double factorials for large numbers.

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