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Given a table of responses with columns:

Username, LessonNumber, QuestionNumber, Response, Score, Timestamp

How would I run a query that returns which users got a score of 90 or better on their first attempt at every question in their last 5 lessons? "last 5 lessons" is a limiting condition, rather than a requirement, so if they completely only 1 lesson, but got all of their first attempts for each question right, then they should be included in the results. We just don't want to look back farther than 5 lessons.

About the data: Users may be on different lessons. Some users may have not yet completed five lessons (may only be on lesson 3 for example). Each lesson has a different number of questions. Users have different lesson paths, so they may skip some lesson numbers or even complete lessons out of sequence.

Since this seems to be a problem of transforming temporally non-uniform/discontinuous values into uniform/contiguous values per-user, I think I can solve the bulk of the problem with a couple ranking function calls. The conditional specification of scoring above 90 for "first attempt at every question in their last 5 lessons" is also tricky, because the number of questions completed is variable per-user.

So far...

As a starting point or hint at what may need to happen, I've transformed Timestamp into an "AttemptNumber" for each question, by using "row_number() over (partition by Username,LessonNumber,QuestionNumber order by Timestamp) as AttemptNumber".

I'm also trying to transform LessonNumber from an absolute value into a contiguous ranked value for individual users. I could use "dense_rank() over (partition by Username order by LessonNumber desc) as LessonRank", but that assumes the order lessons are completed corresponds with the order of LessonNumber, which is unfortunately not always the case. However, let's assume that this is the case, since I do have a way of producing such a number through a couple of joins, so I can use the dense_rank transform described to select the "last 5 completed lessons" (i.e. LessonRank <= 5).

For the >90 condition, I think I can transform the score into an integer so that it's "1" if >= 90, and "0" if < 90. I can then introduce a clause like "group by Username having SUM(Score)=COUNT(Score).", which will select only those users with all scores equal to 1.

Any solutions or suggestions would be appreciated.

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This is a "greatest-n-per-group" style problem. Search that and you'll probably find what you're looking for. –  Matthew Jan 19 '11 at 20:31
    
How do define (from the data) which lessons are the last 5? Is it select distinct lessonnumber from table order by timestamp desc limit 5 ? –  derobert Jan 19 '11 at 20:38
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You kind of gave away the solution:

SELECT DISTINCT Username
FROM Results 
WHERE Username NOT in (
    SELECT DISTINCT Username
    FROM (
        SELECT
            r.Username,r.LessonNumber, r.QuestionNumber, r.Score, r.Timestamp
            , row_number() over (partition by r.Username,r.LessonNumber,r.QuestionNumber order by r.Timestamp) as AttemptNumber
            , dense_rank() over (partition by r.Username order by r.LessonNumber desc) AS LessonRank
        FROM Results r
        ) as f
    WHERE LessonRank <= 5 and AttemptNumber = 1 and Score < 90
)

Concerning the LessonRank, I used exactly what you desribed since it is not clear how to order the lessons otherwise: The timestamp of the first attempt of the first question of a lesson? Or the timestamp of the first attempt of any question of a lesson? Or simply the first(or the most recent?) timestamp of any result of any question of a lesson?

The innermost Select adds all the AttemptNumber and LessonRank as provided by you.

The next Select retains only the results which would disqualify a user to be in the final list - all first attempts with an insufficient score in the last 5 lessons. We end up with a list of users we do not want to display in the final result.

Therefore, in the outermost Select, we can select all the users which are not in the exclusion list. Basically all the other users which have answered any question.

EDIT: As so often, second try should be better...

One more EDIT:

Here's a version including your remarks in the comments.

SELECT Username
FROM 
(
    SELECT Username, CASE WHEN Score >= 90 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS QuestionScoredWell
    FROM (
        SELECT
            r.Username,r.LessonNumber, r.QuestionNumber, r.Score, r.Timestamp
            , row_number() over (partition by r.Username,r.LessonNumber,r.QuestionNumber order by r.Timestamp) as AttemptNumber
            , dense_rank() over (partition by r.Username order by r.LessonNumber desc) AS LessonRank
        FROM Results r
        ) as f
    WHERE LessonRank <= 5 and AttemptNumber = 1
) as ff
Group BY Username
HAVING MIN(QuestionScoredWell) = 1

I used a Having clause with a MIN expression on the calculated QuestionScoredWell value.

When comparing the execution plans for both queries, this query is actually faster. Not sure though whether this is partially due to the low number of data rows in my table.

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Thanks for the reply! Yeah, did kinda give it away, but a simple confirmation with working syntax like this is just what I expected as an answer, so congratulations. A simple example like that I feel is more useful to the community anyway for understanding the problem and building a solution. –  Triynko Jan 20 '11 at 15:45
    
In the end, I actually avoided this kind of "invert the set" approach though so I could obtain the actual count of questions that scored >= 90. I ended up transforming the score for each attempt into a boolean value with a case statement (case when score >= 90 then 1 else 0 end) as AttemptScoredWell. I then collapsed the attempts with an additional query level where I grouped on the question and introduced a field "case when SUM(AttemptScoredWell) > 0 then 1 else 0 end as QuestionScoredWell", in other words if any attempt scored well, the question as a whole scored well. –  Triynko Jan 20 '11 at 15:47
    
Finally, in the outermost query, I could check that SUM(QuestionScoredWell) = COUNT(QuestionScoredWell) to select only rows where all questions scored well, which is a nice way to do it, because I can now do something like "where (SUM(QuestionScoredWell) / COUNT(QuestionScoredWell)) > 0.8" to check that like 80% of the questions scored well! That's one of the advantages of computing values directly, rather than trying to be clever and recognizing that some special case is equivalent to something else, using an "invert the set" approach, etc. –  Triynko Jan 20 '11 at 15:50
    
... and it looks like it's actually executing faster. I added an example using computed values as you mentioned. –  marapet Jan 20 '11 at 20:30
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Random suggestions:

1

The conditional specification of scoring above 90 for "first attempt at every question in their last 5 lessons" is also tricky, because the number of questions is variable per-user.

is equivalent to

There exists no first attempt with a score <= 90 most-recent 5 lessons

which strikes me as a little easier to grab with a NOT EXISTS subquery.

2

First attempt is the same as where timestamp = (select min(timestamp) ... )

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. (1) Yes, those are equivalent, although I opted for a more direct approach so that I could obtain the # of questions that scored >= 90 as (case when score >= 90 then 1 else 0 end), which I could then group by question and sum to see how many questions scored above 90. I also have an additional subquery to merge attempts for each question, so that the question is counted if any attempt scores 90. So concerning point (2), rather than using MIN, which would limit me to first attempt only, I use row_number() over... which allows selection of attempt numbers like "AttemptNum in (1,2,3)". –  Triynko Jan 20 '11 at 15:12
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You need to identify the top 5 lessons per user first, using the timestamp to prioritize lessons, then you can limit by score. Try:

Select username
from table t inner join
(select top 5 username, lessonNumber
 from table
 order by timestamp desc) l 
on t.username = l.username and t.lessonNumber = l.lessonNumber
from table
where score >= 90
share|improve this answer
    
Such an approach could be useful, although I find the dense_rank to be more desirable because it makes the query a lot clearer and avoids (correlated) subqueries. In your example, I think I would need to add "distinct" or "group by" into the top 5 selection and correlate it somehow, because that would just give me the top 5 responses, which would repeat the same lesson number 5 times if there were, for example, 5 attempts for one question. –  Triynko Jan 20 '11 at 15:37
    
What I'd need is this correlated subquery "(select top 5 Username, LessonNumber, MIN(Timestamp) as LessonTimestamp from Responses r where Username = outer_query_table.Username group by Username, LessonNumber order by LessonTimestamp desc)", which is less clear than just using "dense_rank() over (partition by r.Username order by r.LessonNumber desc) as LessonRank", which allows me to very directly select the last X lessons. I could even use an SQL variable to limit it to the last X lessons if I'd like in the where clause, whereas the "top 5" syntax is hardcoded at 5. –  Triynko Jan 20 '11 at 15:38
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