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Our application uses the TPL to serialize (potentially) long running units of work. The creation of work (tasks) is user-driven and may be cancelled at any time. In order to have a responsive user interface, if the current piece of work is no longer required we would like to abandon what we were doing, and immediately start a different task.

Tasks are queued up something like this:

private Task workQueue;
private void DoWorkAsync
    (Action<WorkCompletedEventArgs> callback, CancellationToken token) 
{
   if (workQueue == null)
   {
      workQueue = Task.Factory.StartWork
          (() => DoWork(callback, token), token);
   }
   else 
   {
      workQueue.ContinueWork(t => DoWork(callback, token), token);
   }
}

The DoWork method contains a long running call, so it is not as simple as constantly checking the status of token.IsCancellationRequested and bailing if/when a cancel is detected. The long running work will block the Task continuations until it finishes, even if the task is cancelled.

I have come up with two sample methods to work around this issue, but am not convinced that either are proper. I created simple console applications to demonstrate how they work.

The important point to note is that the continuation fires before the original task completes.

Attempt #1: An inner task

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
   var token = cts.Token;
   token.Register(() => Console.WriteLine("Token cancelled"));
   // Initial work
   var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
     {
        Console.WriteLine("Doing work");

      // Wrap the long running work in a task, and then wait for it to complete
      // or the token to be cancelled.
        var innerT = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Thread.Sleep(3000), token);
        innerT.Wait(token);
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        Console.WriteLine("Completed.");
     }
     , token);
   // Second chunk of work which, in the real world, would be identical to the
   // first chunk of work.
   t.ContinueWith((lastTask) =>
         {
             Console.WriteLine("Continuation started");
         });

   // Give the user 3s to cancel the first batch of work
   Console.ReadKey();
   if (t.Status == TaskStatus.Running)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Cancel requested");
      cts.Cancel();
      Console.ReadKey();
   }
}

This works, but the "innerT" Task feels extremely kludgey to me. It also has the drawback of forcing me to refactor all parts of my code that queue up work in this manner, by necessitating the wrapping up of all long running calls in a new Task.

Attempt #2: TaskCompletionSource tinkering

static void Main(string[] args)
{  var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
//Wire up the token's cancellation to trigger the TaskCompletionSource's cancellation
   CancellationTokenSource cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
   var token = cts.Token;
   token.Register(() =>
         {   Console.WriteLine("Token cancelled");
             tcs.SetCanceled();
          });
   var innerT = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
      {
          Console.WriteLine("Doing work");
          Thread.Sleep(3000);
          Console.WriteLine("Completed.");
    // When the work has complete, set the TaskCompletionSource so that the
    // continuation will fire.
          tcs.SetResult(null);
       });
   // Second chunk of work which, in the real world, would be identical to the
   // first chunk of work.
   // Note that we continue when the TaskCompletionSource's task finishes,
   // not the above innerT task.
   tcs.Task.ContinueWith((lastTask) =>
      {
         Console.WriteLine("Continuation started");
      });
   // Give the user 3s to cancel the first batch of work
   Console.ReadKey();
   if (innerT.Status == TaskStatus.Running)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Cancel requested");
      cts.Cancel();
      Console.ReadKey();
   }
}

Again this works, but now I have two problems:

a) It feels like I'm abusing TaskCompletionSource by never using it's result, and just setting null when I've finished my work.

b) In order to properly wire up continuations I need to keep a handle on the previous unit of work's unique TaskCompletionSource, and not the task that was created for it. This is technically possible, but again feels clunky and strange.

Where to go from here?

To reiterate, my question is: are either of these methods the "correct" way to tackle this problem, or is there a more correct/elegant solution that will allow me to prematurely abort a long running task and immediately starting a continuation? My preference is for a low-impact solution, but I'd be willing to undertake some huge refactoring if it's the right thing to do.

Alternately, is the TPL even the correct tool for the job, or am I missing a better task queuing mechanism. My target framework is .NET 4.0.

share|improve this question
    
I also asked the question over here: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/parallelextensions/thread/… –  Andrew Anderson Jan 21 '11 at 13:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The real issue here is that the long-running call in DoWork is not cancellation-aware. If I understand correctly, what you're doing here is not really cancelling the long-running work, but merely allowing the continuation to execute and, when the work completes on the cancelled task, ignoring the result. For example, if you used the inner task pattern to call CrunchNumbers(), which takes several minutes, cancelling the outer task will allow continuation to occur, but CrunchNumbers() will continue to execute in the background until completion.

I don't think there's any real way around this other than making your long-running calls support cancellation. Often this isn't possible (they may be blocking API calls, with no API support for cancellation.) When this is the case, it's really a flaw in the API; you may check to see if there are alternate API calls that could be used to perform the operation in a way that can be cancelled. One hack approach to this is to capture a reference to the underlying Thread being used by the Task when the Task is started and then call Thread.Interrupt. This will wake up the thread from various sleep states and allow it to terminate, but in a potentially nasty way. Worst case, you can even call Thread.Abort, but that's even more problematic and not recommended.


Here is a stab at a delegate-based wrapper. It's untested, but I think it will do the trick; feel free to edit the answer if you make it work and have fixes/improvements.

public sealed class AbandonableTask
{
    private readonly CancellationToken _token;
    private readonly Action _beginWork;
    private readonly Action _blockingWork;
    private readonly Action<Task> _afterComplete;

    private AbandonableTask(CancellationToken token, 
                            Action beginWork, 
                            Action blockingWork, 
                            Action<Task> afterComplete)
    {
        if (blockingWork == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("blockingWork");

        _token = token;
        _beginWork = beginWork;
        _blockingWork = blockingWork;
        _afterComplete = afterComplete;
    }

    private void RunTask()
    {
        if (_beginWork != null)
            _beginWork();

        var innerTask = new Task(_blockingWork, 
                                 _token, 
                                 TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
        innerTask.Start();

        innerTask.Wait(_token);
        if (innerTask.IsCompleted && _afterComplete != null)
        {
            _afterComplete(innerTask);
        }
    }

    public static Task Start(CancellationToken token, 
                             Action blockingWork, 
                             Action beginWork = null, 
                             Action<Task> afterComplete = null)
    {
        if (blockingWork == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("blockingWork");

        var worker = new AbandonableTask(token, beginWork, blockingWork, afterComplete);
        var outerTask = new Task(worker.RunTask, token);
        outerTask.Start();
        return outerTask;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your understanding is correct. We are fine with allowing our "CrunchNumbers" to run to completion, but that result will be ignored whenever it comes in. –  Andrew Anderson Jan 20 '11 at 16:11
    
If that's the case, I think your inner task pattern is the cleanest approach. It maps most logically, in my mind, to what you're really doing. You're launching a long-running task as part of your operation and, if cancelled, you essentially 'abandon' that inner task and continue. I think you can ameliorate some of the awkwardness of the pattern by encapsulating it into a generic helper class; a few possible designs come to mind, but I'm sure you can find something that maps nicely to the actual code you'll need to change. –  Dan Bryant Jan 20 '11 at 16:16
    
Thanks for the wrapper code - massive distractions kept me from trying it out yesterday - hopefully today will be saner. I'm currently pursuing a wrapping-up of my attempt #2 (yours is a wrap-up of attempt #1), so once I'm done that I'll experiment with your code as well. Also of note, I got a response from Stephen Toub over here: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/parallelextensions/thread/… –  Andrew Anderson Jan 21 '11 at 13:43

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