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I am not sure my question has a concrete answer, but anyway. I am writing a function with a lot of parameters, each one can be either None or have a limited range of values. Since I don't trust the user to give me good input, I have to check each parameter for its type, and if it's in the right type (or None), then I would like to see if it's in the right range. This mean I have a lot of code like this:

# size
if isinstance(size, str):
    if size in range(4):
        self.data[uid]['size'] = int(size)
    else:
        warnings.warn("ID %s: illegal size %s" % (uid, size))
        self.data[uid]['size'] = None
elif size == None:                                
    self.data[uid]['size'] = None
else:
    warnings.warn("ID %s: illegal size %s" % (uid, str(size)))
    self.data[uid]['size'] = None

etc. As this is becoming repetitive, I was wondering if there might be a library that would automate this, throw exceptions/warnings and reduce code redundancy.

Thanks

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6  
I have to check each parameter for its type Sounds like you're doing it wrong. You should just use it as the expected type and then catch the failure. –  Falmarri Jan 19 '11 at 22:03
3  
I used to think I had to check the input too. When I stopped doing that, programing became MUCH easier. Just assume it's fine, and handle the errors. This is related to the python idiom "Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission". –  Wilduck Jan 19 '11 at 22:07
2  
Use size is None instead of == (because == calls .__eq__() which may or may not behave correctly when comparing against None). –  Greg Hewgill Jan 19 '11 at 22:08
1  
Since when can isinstance(size, str) and size == None both be true? Since when can isinstance(size, str) and size in range(4) both be true?? You have if/else/elif/else at the same level of indentation! Please consider posting a careful copy of code that actually compiles and runs (and doesn't have any tabs in it). –  John Machin Jan 19 '11 at 22:27
1  
Just to be extra pedantic, the check should most likely be isinstance(size, basestring), just incase size is a unicode. –  David Wolever Jan 19 '11 at 22:29
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was wondering if there might be a library that would automate this, throw exceptions/warnings and reduce code redundancy.

I use formencode for stuff like this. It appears to be only for parsing HTML forms, but it will happily parse and validate anything you pass to it. You define schema classes that validate all input at once.

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I would rewrite this:

# size
if isinstance(size, str):
    if size in range(4):
        self.data[uid]['size'] = int(size)
    else:
        warnings.warn("ID %s: illegal size %s" % (uid, size))
        self.data[uid]['size'] = None
elif size == None:                                
    self.data[uid]['size'] = None
else:
    warnings.warn("ID %s: illegal size %s" % (uid, str(size)))
    self.data[uid]['size'] = None

like this:

if size in ["0", "1", "2", "3"]: # alternative: if size in map(str, range(4)):
    self.data[uid]['size'] = int(size)
else:
    if size != None:
        warnings.warn("ID %s: illegal size %s" % (uid, size))
    self.data[uid]['size'] = None    

What I sincerely don't like is the use of isinstance(size, str) (explicit typechecking is generally frowned upon in Python since it easily breaks ducktyping).

This is the reason why you won't easily find a library in Python to automate typechecking: it goes against the core intent of the language.

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-1: Inconsistent: gets an exception if size == "foo" or size == "123.45" but a warning if size is "-666" and no warning if size == 1.23 (a float) –  John Machin Jan 19 '11 at 23:54
    
@John Machin: True, fixed (for the OP's assumed requirements). –  ChristopheD Jan 19 '11 at 23:59
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I would agree with the above: assume the size is of the right type, let an exception be raised (or an error be returned) if it isn't.

There is a useful pattern, though, when you're dealing with input that might raise an exception: wrapping any exceptions raised by the input so they include the input. For example, so you'll get:

ParseError: while parsing 'number = foo': ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'foo'

The code looks something like this:

try:
    parse(input)
catch Exception, e:
    raise ParseError("while parsing %r: %r" %(input, e)), None, sys.exc_info()[2]

The third argument to raise will use the original traceback, so the stack trace will point you to the line which actually caused the error (eg, size = int(value)) rather than the call to raise.

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If your project is a library and your "user" is another developer, don't do this at all. At most, replace your tests with an assertion:

assert 0 <= int(size) <= 4, "size must be between 0 and 4"

This way, when the user provides bad input, they'll hear about it straight away - then it becomes their responsibility to get it right.


If your project is an application and your "user" is my grandmother, you need to do your own verification: crashing out is not an acceptable response. However, in this case you should know more about the possible input (for example, it's come from a text box, therefore it can only be a string).

My suggestion would be to code your utility functions as above and perform validation separately (ie. UI layer). It is very rare that a utility/library function should validate and override (even with a warning) the value: it needs to prevent the caller/user from getting any further until they have gotten their side of things right.

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