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I am having trouble applying openmp to a nested loop like this:

        #pragma omp parallel shared(S2,nthreads,chunk) private(a,b,tid)
    {
        tid = omp_get_thread_num();
        if (tid == 0)
        {
            nthreads = omp_get_num_threads();
            printf("\nNumber of threads = %d\n", nthreads);
        }
        #pragma omp for schedule(dynamic,chunk)
        for(a=0;a<NREC;a++){
            for(b=0;b<NLIG;b++){
                S2=S2+cos(1+sin(atan(sin(sqrt(a*2+b*5)+cos(a)+sqrt(b)))));
            }
        } // end for a
    } /* end of parallel section */

When I compare the serial with the openmp version, the last one gives weird results. Even when I remove #pragma omp for, the results from openmp are not correct, do you know why or can point to a good tutorial explicit about double loops and openmp?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is a classic example of a race condition. Each of your openmp threads is accessing and updating a shared value at the same time, and there's no guaantee that some of the updates won't get lost (at best) or the resulting answer won't be gibberish (at worst).

The thing with race conditions is that they depend sensitively on the timing; in a smaller case (eg, with smaller NREC and NLIG) you might sometimes miss this, but in a larger case, it'll eventually always come up.

The reason you get wrong answers without the #pragma omp for is that as soon as you enter the parallel region, all of your openmp threads start; and unless you use something like an omp for (a so-called worksharing construct) to split up the work, each thread will do everything in the parallel section - so all the threads will be doing the same entire sum, all updating S2 simultatneously.

You have to be careful with OpenMP threads updating shared variables. OpenMP has atomic operations to allow you to safely modify a shared variable. An example follows (unfortunately, your example is so sensitive to summation order it's hard to see what's going on, so I've changed your sum somewhat:). In the mysumallatomic, each thread updates S2 as before, but this time it's done safely:

#include <omp.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>

double mysumorig() {

    double S2 = 0;
    int a, b;
    for(a=0;a<128;a++){
        for(b=0;b<128;b++){
            S2=S2+a*b;
        }
    }

    return S2;
}


double mysumallatomic() {

    double S2 = 0.;
#pragma omp parallel for shared(S2)
    for(int a=0; a<128; a++){
        for(int b=0; b<128;b++){
            double myterm = (double)a*b;
            #pragma omp atomic
            S2 += myterm;
        }
    }

    return S2;
}


double mysumonceatomic() {

    double S2 = 0.;
#pragma omp parallel shared(S2)
    {
        double mysum = 0.;
        #pragma omp for
        for(int a=0; a<128; a++){
            for(int b=0; b<128;b++){
                mysum += (double)a*b;
            }
        }
        #pragma omp atomic
        S2 += mysum;
    }
    return S2;
}

int main() {
    printf("(Serial)      S2 = %f\n", mysumorig());
    printf("(All Atomic)  S2 = %f\n", mysumallatomic());
    printf("(Atomic Once) S2 = %f\n", mysumonceatomic());
    return 0;
}

However, that atomic operation really hurts parallel performance (after all, the whole point is to prevent parallel operation around the variable S2!) so a better approach is to do the summations and only do the atomic operation after both summations rather than doing it 128*128 times; that's the mysumonceatomic() routine, which only incurs the synchronization overhead once per thread rather than 16k times per thread.

But this is such a common operation that there's no need to implment it yourself. One can use an OpenMP built-in functionality for reduction operations (a reduction is an operation like calculating a sum of a list, finding the min or max of a list, etc, which can be done one element at a time only by looking at the result so far and the next element) as suggested by @ejd. OpenMP will work and is faster (it's optimized implementation is much faster than what you can do on your own with other OpenMP operations).

As you can see, either approach works:

$ ./foo
(Serial)      S2 = 66064384.000000
(All Atomic)  S2 = 66064384.000000
(Atomic Once) S2 = 66064384.00000
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thanks for pointint this out, as this seems to be the problem, I am testing it now –  flow Jan 21 '11 at 7:00
    
what I am curious about is, what would happen if you change a*b, which is non-problematic at all, for some more complicated expression like mine's –  flow Jan 25 '11 at 11:09
    
I see that even using omp atomic on my code, I get weird results. Is it there some way to check when my program runs that no race conditions arise? I mean, to be sure that in no case two threads try to modify the variable S2 at the same time –  flow Jan 25 '11 at 11:26
    
Werner: What do you mean by "weird results"? If you mean your original summation varys by +/- 1/2%, that's because the summation you have chosen is very numerically unstable - the answer you get is very sensitive to the order in which you add the numbers. You can see that even in purely serial code by comparing the summation you get with the same summation but reversing the order of the loops, or having the loops go from NREC...0 and NLIG..0 rather than 0..NREC, etc. That's a property of your sum and floating point arithmetic, not OpenMP. –  Jonathan Dursi Jan 25 '11 at 13:34
    
In terms of checking for race conditions - in small snippets of code like this, it shouldn't be much of an issue. In your parallel section, set default(shared) so that you have to explicitly declare the shared/private state of each variable, and look carefully at how each shared variable is updated within the section. There are commercial static analysis tools for OpenMP code - VivaMP is one, intel has some thread analyzer tools, and the intel c/c++ compiler has /Qdiag-enable:sc-parallel for some basic checks. –  Jonathan Dursi Jan 25 '11 at 13:36

The problem isn't with double loops but with variable S2. Try putting a reduction clause on your for directive:

#pragma omp for schedule(dynamic,chunk) reduction(+:S2)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot. know I get better and more consistent results although openmp final S2 results differs about 1% from the serial version, and each time a run the program, openmp results for S2 change. Which could be the reason? –  flow Jan 19 '11 at 22:16
    
which is the formal and exct meaning of variable reduction here? –  flow Jan 19 '11 at 22:18
    
Reduction can take various forms. You can look at the OpenMP V3.0 spec, section 2.9.3.6 reduction clause, for a list of some of the typical forms. In your case, the form is: var += expression. As for the varience between runs, the order that the calculations are being done is different than the serial order. I don't know what your loop ranges are or your chunking factor, so it is hard to say much more. However, if you are adding a big number to a small number vs. a big number and a big number, some significant digits can be lost. –  ejd Jan 19 '11 at 23:29

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