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I have an interface and two classes which implement it. I'm getting a compiler error, and I'm not quite sure why.

interface IPerson
{
    ICollection<string> NickNames{get;set;}
}
class ObservablePerson : IPerson
{
    ObservableCollection<string> NickNames{get;set;}
}
class ListPerson : IPerson
{
    List<string> NickNames{get;set;}
}

I'm having a bit of trouble understanding why this won't work, as List and ObservableCollection both implement ICollection.

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Please state the compiler error. –  Robert Harvey Jan 19 '11 at 22:27
    
@Robert, it would be "ObservablePerson does not implement interface member IPerson.NickNames" and further stuff about non-matching return types. And, for that matter, the implementations must also be public. –  Anthony Pegram Jan 19 '11 at 22:30
    
This is a duplicate of the hundreds of variance questions. –  John Saunders Jan 19 '11 at 22:32
    
Forgot about the public modifier. And I did not know this is a "variance" question as I'm still learning. –  user582181 Jan 19 '11 at 22:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'm having a bit of trouble understanding why this won't work, as List and ObservableCollection both implement ICollection.

Yes, but the interface states that an ICollection<string> is returned. The underlying type may be an ObservableCollection<string> or a List<string>, but the signature needs to conform to the interface. An ObservableCollection<string> is an ICollection<string>, but an ICollection<string> is not necessarily an ObservableCollection<string>.

Also, your methods need to be public (they are currently private). Interfaces don't deal with private or protected methods, it defines the public interface.

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Right. For more, look at the fact that the property has a setter. A consumer of IPerson should think that he can set the property to any ICollection<string>, but that's clearly not the case if the provided code could actually compile. –  Anthony Pegram Jan 19 '11 at 22:33
    
Yes, good point. –  Ed S. Jan 19 '11 at 22:34
    
Yeah, I forgot to add the public modifier. –  user582181 Jan 19 '11 at 22:42
    
Ok, but do you understand the rational now? –  Ed S. Jan 19 '11 at 22:53
    
Yes. Thanks for all the explantions guys! –  user582181 Jan 19 '11 at 22:58

It should be

interface IPerson
{
    ICollection<string> NickNames{get;set;}
}
class ObservablePerson : IPerson
{
    ICollection<string> NickNames{get;set;}
}
class ListPerson : IPerson
{
    ICollection<string> NickNames{get;set;}
}

And inside the implementation, you can return a List object or ObservableCollection

Edited code

interface IPerson
    {
        ICollection<string> NickNames{get;set;}
    }

public class ObservablePerson : IPerson
    {
        ICollection<string> nickNames = new ObservableCollection<string>();

        public ICollection<string> IPerson.NickNames
        {
            get
            {
                return nickNames;
            }
            set
            {
                nickNames = value;
            }
        }
    }
    public class ListPerson : IPerson
    {
        ICollection<string> nickNames = new List<string>();

        public ICollection<string> IPerson.NickNames
        {
            get
            {
                return nickNames;
            }
            set
            {
                nickNames = value;
            }
        }
    }
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So anyone who uses the ObservablePerson class should just know to cast the NickNames to an ObservableCollection? Or would there be a better way? –  user582181 Jan 19 '11 at 22:45
    
I've updated my code so there would be no need for casting. –  Divi Jan 19 '11 at 22:56

Your issue is that the compiler expects both of your subclasses to return a type of ICollection. You can return a List or ObservableCollection via the get accessor, but the declared member type needs to remain ICollection.

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The compiler will insist on exact type matches, but you can shadow the property when accessed on the class (instead of through the interface). Note however, that when setting through the interface someone may assign a different kind of ICollection<string> - so this would result in an exception.

interface IPerson
{
    ICollection<string> NickNames { get; set; }
}
class ObservablePerson : IPerson
{
    public new ObservableCollection<string> NickNames { get; set; }
    ICollection<string> IPerson.NickNames
    {
        get { return NickNames; }
        set { NickNames = (ObservableCollection<string>)value; }
    }
}
class ListPerson : IPerson
{
    public new List<string> NickNames { get; set; }
    ICollection<string> IPerson.NickNames
    {
        get { return NickNames; }
        set { NickNames = (List<string>)value; }
    }
}
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I just ran into a similar problem, and a buddy of mine suggested an excellent solution: Generic types. Here's what you can do:

public interface IPerson<CollectionType> where CollectionType : ICollection<string>
{
    CollectionType NickNames { get; set; }
}

class ObservablePerson : IPerson<ObservableCollection<string>>
{
    public ObservableCollection<string> NickNames { get; set; }
}

public class ListPerson : IPerson<List<string>>
{
    public List<string> NickNames { get; set; }
}

Here, "CollectionType" is a Generic, and can be named whatever you want (It's often called T throughout the .NET Framework, but giving it a meaningful name I feel is helpful). This will allow you to implement an interface on those ObservablePerson and ListPerson, while still having different types for the NickNames property on each (though any type that you use for CollectionType will need to implement ICollection).

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