Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C++, using the vector header, how do I find the number of elements?

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
int primer(int max);
int main()
{
    system("pause");
    return 0;
    primer(1000);
}

int primer(int max){
    vector<int> a;
    a[1]=2;
    for (int i=2;i<=max;i++){
    bool prime=true;
    for (int ii=1;ii<=#a;ii++) {
    if i/a[ii]==math.floor(i/a[ii]) {
    prime=false;
    }
    }
    if prime==true {
    a[#a+1]=i;
    }
    }
    for (i=1;i<=#a;i++) {
    cout << a[i]);
    }
}
}

I originally wrote the code for lua, and this is my attempt to translate it to C++. I would appreciate specifics, for example, a specific replacement for a bad line. I tried to replace #a with a.size, but it didn't work.

Revised:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
int primer(int max);
int main()
{
    primer(5);
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

int primer(int max){
    vector<int> a;
    a[1]=2;
    for (int i=2;i<=max;i++){
    bool prime=true;
    for (int ii=0;ii<a.size();ii++) {
    if (i/a[ii]==floor(i/a[ii])) {
    prime=false;
    }
    }
    if (prime==true) {
    a.push_back(i);
    }
    }
    for (int iii=0;iii<=a.size();iii++) {
    cout << a[iii] << endl;
    }
}

It crashes without running. For what reason is this?

share|improve this question
1  
You're going to have range problems too. To use a vector properly, you'll have to either give it a size or use push_back. –  Fred Larson Jan 19 '11 at 22:43
2  
@TimeCoder: No offense, but attempting to learn to program in C++ (edit) by posting on SO is going to waste both your time and ours. –  John Dibling Jan 19 '11 at 22:43
    
The same as or a replacement for the 99% similar question stackoverflow.com/questions/4741436/boundless-arrays, that you just posted yourself. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 19 '11 at 22:44
    
@Tomalak: This one is trying to use std::vector as suggested in the answers to the other. Yes they should have been linked, no it isn't a dupe. –  Ben Voigt Jan 19 '11 at 22:49
1  
@PigBen: Are you kidding? The 32-line code snippets are practically identical! And the other one wasn't about vectors at all. Weird. He should have extended his original question, because he was merely building on the responses he was getting there. He should have addressed queries about those responses on that thread. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 19 '11 at 23:36

5 Answers 5

a.size().

I would recommend using some sort of reference material, e.g. http://cplusplus.com/reference/stl/vector/.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh! .size(), not a property. That makes sense. Thanks :) –  TimeCoder Jan 19 '11 at 22:43
1  
a.size() is not the last usable index though... –  Ben Voigt Jan 19 '11 at 22:46
    
cplusplus.com is well-known to be full of mistakes. The Apache stdlib reference is superior. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 19 '11 at 22:59
    
@TimeCode: There is not such thing as "property" in C++ –  John Dibling Jan 19 '11 at 23:00
    
@John Dibling, exactly. That was the mistake I made. –  TimeCoder Jan 19 '11 at 23:04

To answer your immediate question:

a.size();  // use size as a function

But there are several other things wrong with your code:

vector<int> a;
a[1]=2;

Ordinarily you need to set the size of a beforehand, since C++ must allocate space for it. You can use push_back() though, which will incrementally add space as needed.

Also, C++ arrays start counting at 0:

for (int ii=1;ii<=#a;ii++) {

This should be

ii = 0

And since arrays start at 0, they end at size() - 1, not size().

share|improve this answer
    
Dang, 6 seconds. +1. –  Fred Larson Jan 19 '11 at 22:41
2  
You spotted the off-by-one error and didn't fix the overrun it caused :( –  Ben Voigt Jan 19 '11 at 22:45
    
@Ben Ah! I'll add now... –  chrisaycock Jan 19 '11 at 22:47
    
Not to mention the fact that @TimeCoder is returning from main before he even calls the function! –  John Dibling Jan 19 '11 at 23:00
    
@John Ninefingers already caught that one. –  chrisaycock Jan 19 '11 at 23:14
for( int ii = 0; ii < a.size(); ++ii )

C and C++ array indexes start at zero and end at size-1, so you need to compare less-than, not less-than-or-equal-to. vector follows the same rule.

share|improve this answer

Another obvious problem that needs pointing out:

int main()
{
    system("pause");
    return 0;
    primer(1000);
}

Your function is never going to be called. Your app will exit when main returns.

share|improve this answer
    
XD Don't worry. Once I saw an error like that I could have fixed it quickly. –  TimeCoder Jan 19 '11 at 22:44
1  
That's good to know! But it had to be said... I can't help myself. –  Nוnɛfוngɛrϛ Jan 19 '11 at 22:47
    
Wow, I totally missed main(). I was so focused on all the issues with primer(). –  chrisaycock Jan 19 '11 at 22:51
 a[#a+1]=i;

changed to use size() becomes:

 a[ a.size() + 1 ] = i;

This is syntactically correct but guaranteed wrong. It should be:

 a.push_back(i);

Read the API referenced by Oli.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually cplusplus.com is well-known to be full of mistakes. The Apache stdlib reference is superior. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 19 '11 at 22:57
    
I have to admit I use the standard document directly. –  Keith Jan 19 '11 at 23:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.