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Totally random but why do we say "an HTML5"? I've seen it in a couple of articles and books and have been a bit thrown off by it, as I would think to write "a HTML5 book" rather than "an HTML5 book".

Here's an example: http://www.w3.org/html/logo/

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closed as off topic by OMG Ponies, Phrogz, Pierre-Alain Vigeant, Bob Kaufman, Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Jan 19 '11 at 23:37

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Try this on english.stackexchange.com. –  Phrogz Jan 19 '11 at 23:22

3 Answers 3

Because it's pronounced "aych te em el"(or similair), the first sound is vocal, and thus "an", not an "a". Not sure this is truly programming related though ).

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The answer is because for acronyms initialisms you pronounce every letter, and the word for the letter 'H' sounds like 'aitch', and hence audibly begins with a vowel. "An Aitch Tee Em Ell Five Book."

See also http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/1016/do-you-use-a-or-an-before-acronyms

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Got ya. Thanks for clearing that up! –  Raphael Essoo-Snowdon Jan 19 '11 at 23:27

H is pronounced /ˈeɪtʃ/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:IPA_for_English#Key

An is the older form (related to one, cognate to German ein; etc.), now used before words starting with a vowel sound, regardless of whether the word begins with a vowel letter.[8] Examples: a light-water reactor; a sanitary sewer overflow; an SSO; a HEPA filter (because HEPA is pronounced as a word rather than as letters); an hour; a ewe; a one-armed bandit; an heir; a unicorn (begins with 'yu', a consonant sound).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_articles

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