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I am beginning to develop a few Android applications and would like to know if I should get the Android Developer Phone. What if I get a normal Android phone? Does the Android Dev Phone provide any benefits other than custom Android builds. Plus I also read somewhere that the Dev Phone "does not enforce signed system images", what would that mean and is this limitation a showstopper?

Thanks for your time with this question.

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You only need your own "system images" if you're going to replace the firmware. No need to do that when developing applications, unless perhaps you want to be able to test with firmware versions your phone's vendor doesn't support. –  Charles Duffy Jan 20 '11 at 0:51
    
Samsung devices are very famous. Purchase different sizes and resolutions. I say this from statistics collected over millions of app users of our app. This will cover you 95% of the phones. Dont use a developer phone. Its a misconception that it will solve all your issues :). I agree with @Daniel –  Siddharth Feb 5 '13 at 7:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

From: http://developer.android.com/guide/developing/device.html You can use any Android-powered device as an environment for running, debugging, and testing your applications. The tools included in the SDK make it easy to install and run your application on the device each time you compile. You can install your application on the device directly from Eclipse or from the command line. If you don't yet have a device, check with the service providers in your area to determine which Android-powered devices are available.

From: Personal experience. Unless you plan on doing some stuff that requires root, any device will be fine. The SDK provides an Android emulator which is pretty robust, but rather slow. Also having to emulate an SD card can be annoying.

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Does the Dev Phone allow to target devices of a wider variety than would be possible to test with any Android phone available in the market? By variety I mean OS versions, screen sizes or hardware capabilities and so on. –  kumar Jan 20 '11 at 2:11
    
I believe the only difference with the G1 and Nexus one dev phones are that they are sim-unlocked. I don't believe there is any other advantage. –  William Tate Jan 20 '11 at 2:31

No you do not need to have an Android Dev Phone. I'm pretty sure that any Android Phone can be used for testing/development. Personally I have used two different Android phones (HTC Hero and HTC Evo) and even a Windows Mobile phone that had Android loaded on it.

Depending on what kind of development you are doing you may not want to use your primary phone for development. Personally I do and have not had any problems.

I have not have had any issues with the a "signed system image". I think the "signed system images" is if you want to try loading your own Android system image. If you are just trying to develop an application this should not limit you in any way.

Hope this helps

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Does the Dev Phone allow to target devices of a wider variety than would be possible to test with any Android phone available in the market? By variety I mean OS versions, screen sizes or hardware capabilities and so on. –  kumar Jan 20 '11 at 2:11
    
How do you think an android dev phone is magically going to be able to reconfigure its screen to different sizes? :} Unless you are doing firmware development, you don't need a dev phone. –  hackbod Jan 20 '11 at 3:26
    
No it does not. However you can test your UI with different screen sizes/densities with the emulator. Here are some links that may help Compatibility: developer.android.com/guide/practices/compatibility.html Different Screen Sizes: developer.android.com/guide/practices/screens_support.html Android Virtual Devices: developer.android.com/guide/developing/tools/avd.html –  Daniel Jan 20 '11 at 17:38

I'd even argue that the NexusOne is a bad choice since most likely the only owners are developers and a few uber nerds who wanted an unlocked phone. Get a phone that is popular. It's far too expensive to own all the popular phones, but at least you'd own one that is out there in the wild and would give you a taste of what the real world experience is on your app.

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