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for example,

var result = from category in myEntities.Categories
                     where category.UserId == userId
                     orderby category.CategoryName
                     select category;

What is the type of "result"? I casted it to an IQueryable variable and it worked except it did not have some of the methods normally available, e.g. Count(). In my program I have to cast it to some explicit types and then use the Count() method. What should I do?

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Your question is unclear. What are you trying to do? –  SLaks Jan 20 '11 at 0:56
    
Your question is not unclear. –  Alex Ford Jan 20 '11 at 1:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use this:

IQueryable<Category> categories = from x category in myEntities.Categories
                                  where category.UserId == userId
                                  orderby category.CategoryName
                                  select category;

I don't see why count would be unavailable in this scenario. Maybe if you were casting to plain IQueryable and not IQueryable<Category>?

EDIT: Just tested it. It's definitely because you used a generic IQueryable without a type. .Count() is not available when you use that. You must include the type.

EDIT2: If you are creating an anonymous type then you have to use the var keyword. You will need to create a type in order to cast it.

Create a custom type like this:

public class MyCustomType
{
     public string CategoryName { get; set; }
     public int UserId { get; set;}
}

Then instantiate your enumerable of custom types like so:

IEnumerable<MyCustomType> myCustomTypes = from x category in myEntities.Categories
                                          where category.UserId == userId
                                          orderby category.CategoryName
                                          select new MyCustomType { CategoryName = category.CategoryName, UserId = category.UserId };

You cannot use IQueryable when doing this as IQueryable allows you to send expression trees to the datasource. myEntities.Categories implements IQueryable so the query we just listed is executed at the source, but further queries on your IEnumerable<MyCustomType> Will be executed on the objects in memory.

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Hi I was actually using select new {...} which is an anonymous type. How do I go about casting it to IQueryable? Thanks. –  Aperture Jan 20 '11 at 1:12
    
If you are creating an anonymous type then you cannot cast it, unless that type corresponds with an existing type. –  Alex Ford Jan 20 '11 at 1:13
    
See my edit for what I mean. –  Alex Ford Jan 20 '11 at 1:21

You should use it as an IQueryable<Category>, which is its compile-time type.

At runtime, it will be an ObjectQuery<Category>. However, you should not use that.

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Hi I was actually using select new {...} which is an anonymous type. How do I go about casting it to IQueryable? Thanks. –  Aperture Jan 20 '11 at 1:13
    
@Aperture: It's already an IQueryable<T>. You don't need to cast at all. –  SLaks Jan 20 '11 at 1:42

As an addition to the other answers, you can also use the AsQueryable() method to get an IQueryable object that will have all the usual Linq query methods on it.

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This is true, however it is usually not a true IQueryable and will not translate expression trees into code at the source, such as SQL. Instead it just does it's best to emulate an IQueryable for casting purposes, usually for unit testing. I suggest not using AsQueryable() where possible because it can be unstable since it is not really connected to an underlying ORM. –  Alex Ford Jan 24 '11 at 15:16

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