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I have a WCF client that has thrown this common error, just to be resolved with retrying the HTTP call to the server. For what it's worth this exception was not generated within 1 minute. It was generated in 3 seconds.

The request operation sent to xxxxxx did not receive a reply within the configured timeout (00:01:00). The time allotted to this operation may have been a portion of a longer timeout. This may be because the service is still processing the operation or because the service was unable to send a reply message. Please consider increasing the operation timeout (by casting the channel/proxy to IContextChannel and setting the OperationTimeout property) and ensure that the service is able to connect to the client

How are professionals handling these common WCF errors? What other bogus errors should I handle.

For example, I'm considering timing the WCF call and if that above (bogus) error is thrown in under 55 seconds, I retry the entire operation (using a while() loop). I believe I have to reset the entire channel, but I'm hoping you guys will tell me what's right to do.

What other

share|improve this question
    
I suggest you ask a separate question on why your 1 minute timeout times out after 3 seconds. That's not actually the way it's meant to work. – John Saunders Jan 20 '11 at 3:15
    
@John: It only occasionaly does that while I'm developing and waiting for my Azure Fabric to start up. I'm guessing that this is a retryable error, and most of my code is based entirely on the WCF samples. – LamonteCristo Jan 20 '11 at 3:45
    
the Azure factor a pretty good reason to ask a separate question. – John Saunders Jan 20 '11 at 3:54

I make all of my WCF calls from a custom "using" statement which handles exceptions and potential retires. My code optionally allows me to pass a policy object to the statement so I can easily change the behavior, like if I don't want to retry on error.

The gist of the code is as follows:

[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)]
public static void ProxyUsing<T>(ClientBase<T> proxy, Action action)
    where T : class
{
    try
    {
        proxy.Open();
        using(OperationContextScope context = new OperationContextScope(proxy.InnerChannel))
        {
          //Add some headers here, or whatever you want
            action();
        }
    }
    catch(FaultException fe)
    {
      //Handle stuff here
    }
    finally
    {
        try
        {
            if(proxy != null
                && proxy.State != CommunicationState.Faulted)
            {
                proxy.Close();
            }
            else
            {
                proxy.Abort();
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            if(proxy != null)
            {
                proxy.Abort();
            }
        }
    }
}

You can then use the call like follows:

ProxyUsing<IMyService>(myService = GetServiceInstance(), () =>
{
    myService.SomeMethod(...);
});

The NoInlining call probably isn't important for you. I need it because I have some custom logging code that logs the call stack after an exception, so it's important to preserve that method hierarchy in that case.

share|improve this answer
    
This is helpful, although Im hoping to learn what exceptions are worthy of catching and what circumstances they are worth it – LamonteCristo Feb 10 '11 at 5:40

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