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I have been working through Ruby Koans and made it to about_triangle_project.rb in which you are required to write the code for a method, triangle.

Code for these items are found here:

https://github.com/edgecase/ruby_koans/blob/master/koans/about_triangle_project.rb

https://github.com/edgecase/ruby_koans/blob/master/koans/triangle.rb

In triangle.rb, I created the following method:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  if ((a == b) && (a == c) && (b == c))
    return :equilateral
  elsif ((a == b) || (a == c) || (b == c))
    return :isosceles
  else
    return :scalene
  end
end

I know from reading Chris Pine's "Learn to Program" there is always more than one way to do things. Although the above code works, I can't help but think there is a more elegant way of doing this. Would anyone out there be willing to offer their thoughts on how they might make such a method more efficient and compact?

Another thing I am curious about is why, for determining an equilateral triangle, I was unable to create the condition of (a == b == c). It is the proof for an equilateral triangle -- my mother, a former geometry teacher said as much -- but Ruby hates the syntax. Is there an easy explanation as to why this is?

Thank you in advance for your time and responses!

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1  
== is an operator that accepts to values (like * or / ). it returns true or false. it is illegal as to not cause confusion (e.g 1 == 1 == 1 would evaluate to false as it is equivalent to (1 == 1) == 1). –  glebm Jan 20 '11 at 1:49
1  
You could've saved a bit of code by using the transitive property for :equilateral: (a == b) && (b == c) –  pkananen May 19 '11 at 20:35
    
Python supports the "a == b == c" syntax (or even "a < b <= c"), but among programming languages that is an exception rather than a rule. –  Todd Owen Jun 10 '12 at 5:30

8 Answers 8

There is an easy explanation for why that is:

== in Ruby is an operator, which performs a specific function. Operators have rules for determining what order they're applied in — so, for example, a + 2 == 3 evaluates the addition before the equality check. But only one operator at a time is evaluated. It doesn't make sense to have two equality checks next to each other, because an equality check evaluates to true or false. Some languages allow this, but it still doesn't work right, because then you'd be evaluating true == c if a and b were equal, which is obviously not true even if a == b == c in mathematical terms.

As for a more elegant solution:

case [a,b,c].uniq.size
when 1 then :equilateral
when 2 then :isosceles
else        :scalene
end

Or, even briefer (but less readable):

[:equilateral, :isosceles, :scalene].fetch([a,b,c].uniq.size - 1)
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Thank you, chuck! I haven't reached using case, uniq or fetch yet in koans, but that is extremely cool (and why I love Ruby!). –  erinbrown Jan 20 '11 at 2:05
3  
+1 for uniq.size; that's elegant. Interesting that you chose to use fetch, as [...][[...].uniq.size] is valid. –  Phrogz Jan 20 '11 at 5:01
    
@Phrogz: I wrote it that way at first, but it was just egregiously unreadable, like the kind of Perl code that people always make fun of, so I figured fetch at least approximated something I'd want to read. –  Chuck Jan 20 '11 at 7:02
1  
I came up with this code: [nil, :equilateral, :isosceles, :scalene][[a,b,c].uniq.size] but I think yours is a little more readable. –  Pablo B. Apr 12 '11 at 21:06
    
Great stuff, but note the two typos (isosceles & scalene) in the briefer solution. Too few changes to edit. –  Jamie Schembri Aug 31 '11 at 23:06

Another approach:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  a, b, c = [a, b, c].sort
  raise TriangleError if a <= 0 or a + b <= c
  return :equilateral if a == c
  return :isosceles if a == b or b == c
  return :scalene
end
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Clever use of the ordering to avoid unnecessary comparisons. –  Todd Owen Jun 10 '12 at 5:35
    
I had to add class TriangleError < StandardError end to the end for this to work. –  SteveO7 Oct 1 '12 at 22:35
def triangle(a, b, c)
  if a == b && a == c              # associativity => only 2 checks are necessary
    :equilateral
  elsif a == b || a == c || b == c # == operator has the highest priority
    :isosceles
  else
    :scalene                       # no need for return keyword
  end
end
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Thank you, glebm! (And for the answer above, too.) –  erinbrown Jan 20 '11 at 2:05
2  
you mean transitivity :) –  Anurag May 7 '11 at 0:38

I borrowed Chuck's cool uniq.size technique and worked it into an oo solution. Originally I just wanted to extract the argument validation as a guard clause to maintain single responsibility principle, but since both methods were operating on the same data, I thought they belonged together in an object.

# for compatibility with the tests
def triangle(a, b, c)
  t = Triangle.new(a, b, c)
  return t.type
end

class Triangle
  def initialize(a, b, c)
    @sides = [a, b, c].sort
    guard_against_invalid_lengths
  end

  def type
    case @sides.uniq.size
    when 1 then :equilateral
    when 2 then :isosceles
    else :scalene
    end
  end

  private
  def guard_against_invalid_lengths
    if @sides.any? { |x| x <= 0 }
      raise TriangleError, "Sides must be greater than 0"
    end

    if @sides[0] + @sides[1] <= @sides[2]
      raise TriangleError, "Not valid triangle lengths"    
    end
  end
end
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This is great answer to the Tests portion of the about_triangle_project_2.rb as well. I copy/pasta'd your solution which was much more elegant that my machine code version. –  TALLBOY Mar 11 '11 at 0:47
class TriangleError < StandardError
end

def triangle(a, b, c)
  sides = [a,b,c].sort

  raise TriangleError if sides.first <= 0 || sides[2] >= sides[1] + sides[0]
  return :equilateral if sides.uniq.length  == 1
  return :isosceles if sides.uniq.length  == 2
  :scalene
end
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Hmm.. I didn't know about uniq - so coming from smalltalk (ages ago) I used:

require 'set'
def triangle(a, b, c)
  case [a, b, c].to_set.count
    when 1 then :equilateral
    when 2 then :isosceles
    else :scalene
  end
end
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I took a look for a more elegant solution than what I had implemented and found this post a year and a half after the fact... But I have to say I really like this solution. It's a nice clean approach that is also very readable; kudos! –  bigtunacan Mar 13 '13 at 21:35

Here is my solution:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  sides = [a, b, c].sort
  raise TriangleError, "Invalid side #{sides[0]}" unless sides[0] > 0
  raise TriangleError, "Impossible triangle" if sides[0] + sides[1] <= sides[2]
  return [:scalene, :isosceles, :equilateral][ 3 - sides.uniq.size ]
end
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Here is my solution:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  return :equilateral if a == b and b == c
  return :isosceles if ( a == b or b == c or a == c )
  return :scalene
end
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