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how can I integrate the PHPExcel into my Zend app.

My actual folder structure is the following:

/application
  controllers
  views  
  etc...
/library
  My
  Zend
  PHPExcel
/public
  index.php

I already include 'My' libs by using (in index.php):

require_once 'Zend/Loader/Autoloader.php';
$autoloader = Zend_Loader_Autoloader::getInstance();
$autoloader->registerNamespace('My_');

Now I also want to use PHPExcel inside one of my controllers like:

$exc = PHPExcel_IOFactory::load('test.xls');
$excelWorksheet = $exc->getActiveSheet();

What do I have to do to make it work and get rid of the Class 'PHPExcel_IOFactory' not found Exception?

Thank you.
-lony

P.S.: A simple $autoloader->registerNamespace('PHPExcel_'); is not working. I tested it.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Place the PHPExcel library into the /library folder, like this:

/application
...
/library
    /PHPExcel
    /PHPExcel.php

Next, in your application.ini config file, add the following:

autoloaderNamespaces[] = "PHPExcel_"
autoloaderNamespaces[] = "PHPExcel"

That should do it. Autoloader takes care of the rest, and you can just start using the example code to read an Excel file.

Update: Added the extra autoloaderNamespace as suggested by commenters

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As described in my question I tried to use $autoloader->registerNamespace('PHPExcel_'); and it was not working. Your solution only move the setting from the index.php to application.ini, but it is still not running. –  lony Jan 27 '11 at 6:39
    
Do you have the same setup in your /library folder? The base PHPExcel.php file is right under /library, and then the rest of the classes is under /library/PHPExcel. I implemented this just yesterday, without any problems –  Miljar Jan 27 '11 at 8:30
    
The only problem with this is that it makes adding PHPExcel as an svn:external either difficult (separate external for PHPExcel.php), or impossible. –  Stephen J. Fuhry Feb 8 '11 at 17:32
    
So I placed PHPExcel library into the /library folder, added line to ini file and (!) updated my index.php file: set_include_path(implode(PATH_SEPARATOR, array(realpath(APPLICATION_PATH . '/../library'),realpath(APPLICATION_PATH . '/../library/PHPExcel'),get_include_path()))); –  Andron Jun 23 '11 at 13:53
    
I did it this way, but when in the controller I call $xlsObj = new PHPExcel(); it returns the error Fatal error: Class 'PHPExcel' not found in... –  cwhisperer Oct 4 '11 at 9:32

I found one solution:

require_once 'PHPExcel/PHPExcel/IOFactory.php';

If somebody has a better one, please keep posting!

@BoltClock: Thanks for updating the Tags.

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1  
Well, from the snippet you posted above your problem is quite obvious, move all of the PHPExcel source one level up, so IOFactory.php is located in library/PHPExcel/IOFactory.php instead of library/PHPExcel/PHPExcel/IOFactory.php. That should do the trick (and you can ditch the require_once). –  wimvds Jan 26 '11 at 16:22

It needs to be in your include path.

If you ever need a custom autoloader for other libraries that don't follow PSR-0, there's this too: Autoload PhpThumb with Zend Framework (disclaimer: I'm the author).

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Hm, looks really like the solution I wanted. I try it out. Thank you. –  lony Jun 3 '11 at 8:12

I know it's 2 years since the question is asked but it may help someone; the easiest way ( not the optimal) is to extract the PHPExcel folder in your Public and then just use the old way ex; (in your controller actions):

                include 'PHPExcel.php';
                include 'PHPExcel/Writer/Excel2007.php';

                $myobject = new PHPExcel();
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