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Chrome and Safari are displaying a border around the image, but I don't want one. There is no border in Mozilla. I've looked through the CSS and HTML, and I can't find anything that is fixing it.

Here is the code:

<tr>
  <td class="near">
    <a href="../index.html"class="near_place">
      <img class="related_photo" />
      <h4 class="nearby"> adfadfad </h4>
      <span class="related_info">asdfadfadfaf</span>
    </a>
    ...

CSS:

a.near_place {
    border: none;
    background: #fff;
    display: block;
}

a.near_place:hover{
    background-color: #F5F5F5;
}

h4.nearby {
    height: auto;
    width: inherit;
    margin-top: -2px;
    margin-bottom: 3px;
    font-size: 12px;
    font-weight: normal;
    color: #000;
    display: inline;
}

img.related_photo {
    width: 80px;
    height: 60px;
    border: none;
    margin-right: 3px;
    float: left;
    overflow: hidden;
}

span.related_info {
    width: inherit;
    height: 48px;
    font-size: 11px;
    color: #666;
    display: block;
}


td.near {
    width: 25%;
    height: 70px;
    background: #FFF;

}

Sorry, I copied some old code before. Here is the code that is giving me trouble

Thanks in advance

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In response to your code edit (which makes both answers provided so far irrelevant): is this border "dotted"? –  thirtydot Jan 20 '11 at 3:36
    
nope, just a solid thin border. It's not black though, its a lightish grey –  golf_nut Jan 20 '11 at 3:37
1  
If your code is as you say it is (complete with border: none;), then I can't see what the problem could be. Are you sure you aren't using some old cached version? –  thirtydot Jan 20 '11 at 3:45
    
This shouldn't matter, but you're missing a space between the quote and the word class. In other words <a href="../index.html"class="near_place"> should be <a href="../index.html" class="near_place"> –  Jared Jan 20 '11 at 3:58
1  
Have you tried it with a src in the <img/> tag? I fired up a test.html in chrome and with an image it looks fine. Without the src though it shows a white box with a gray border. I believe your answer lies below (see sarcastyx). –  Brett Pontarelli Jan 20 '11 at 4:58

7 Answers 7

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Now I don't know if this is a bug with Chrome or not but the grey border appears when it can't find the image, the image url is broken or as in your case the src isn't there. If you give the image a proper URL and the browser finds it then the border goes away. If the image is to not have a src then you will need to remove the height and width.

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I'm with a similar problem, I'm using a sprite with background-position and background-image. If I remove the width and the height, the image just vanish. –  Michel Ayres Jan 8 '13 at 14:48
1  
@MichelAyres for a sprite you will need to give it a height and width and will need to look at the code to figure out what is happening. I would recommend asking your own question and posting the defective code so that we can give you more help with this. –  sarcastyx Jan 8 '13 at 23:10

sarcastyx is right, but if you want a workarround you can set the width and height to 0 and a padding to make space for your image.

If you want a icon of 36x36, you can set width and height to 0 and pading:18px

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Thanks; this helped me a ton, Gonzalo! –  SoreThumb Dec 21 '12 at 21:13

This may happen when the image is planted dynamically by css (e.g. by http://webcodertools.com/imagetobase64converter) in order to avoid extra HTTP requests. In this case we don't want to have a default image because of performance issues. I've solved it by switching from an img tag to a div tag.

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.related_photo {
   content: '';
}
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This removes the border in Chrome and Safari. A little explanation would be helpful, though. –  showdev Oct 17 at 17:54
img.related_photo {
  width: 80px;
  height: 60px;
  **border: solid thin #DFDFDF;** //just remove this line
  margin-right: 3px;
  float: left;
  overflow: hidden;
}
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Sorry, I copied some old code before. Here is the code that is giving me trouble –  golf_nut Jan 20 '11 at 3:31

Inside img.related_photo, you need to change border: solid thin #DFDFDF; to border: 0.

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1  
While border: 0 technically works, the correct way to do it is with border: none because border: 0 implies that there is still a border, but it's width just happens to be 0 so you don't see it. –  Jared Jan 20 '11 at 4:00
2  
@Jared: Same difference? –  thirtydot Jan 20 '11 at 4:01

To summarise the answers given already: your options to remove the grey border from an img:not([src]), but still display an image using background-image in Chrome/Safari are:

  • Use a different tag that doesn't have this behaviour. (Thanks @Druvision)
    Eg: div or span.
    Sad face: it's not quite as semantic.

  • Use padding to define the dimensions. (Thanks @Gonzalo)
    Eg padding: 16px 10px 1px; replaces width:20px; height:17px;
    Sad face: dimensions and intentions aren't as obvious in the CSS, especially if it's not an even square like @Gonalo's example.

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