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Background

As I understand it, the Unit of Work (UoW) pattern essentially provides transaction semantics. In other words, given a domain of aggregates persisted by repositories, a UoW class allows consumers of the domain to register invocations of repository methods into an atomic operation. Say we have:

interface IAggregate<TKey> {
    TKey Id { get; }
}

interface IRepository<TEntity, in TKey> where TEntity : IAggregate<TKey> {
    TEntity Get(TKey id);
    void Save(TEntity entity);
    void Remove(TEntity entity);
}

interface IUnitOfWork {
    void RegisterSave<TEntity>(TEntity entity);
    void RegisterRemove<TEntity>(TEntity entity);
    void RegisterUnitOfWork(IUnitOfWork uow);
    void Commit();
    void Rollback();
}

Assume the implementations of IRepository use a relational database, and the implementation of IUnitOfWork.Commit merely sets up a transaction with the database and proceeds to invoke Save or Remove on the appropriate IRepository instances for all the operations that had been registered. I'd say what I outlined above is a standard, direct interpretation of the Aggregate Root, Repository, and UoW patterns (NHibernate/EF and all their bloated glory notwithstanding).

In the past, I have interpreted the concept of aggregate root boundaries as meaning that references from one aggregate to another should be objectified by an Id property of the target aggregate on the source aggregate. For example:

class User : IAggregate<int> {
  int Id { get; private set; }
}

class Blog : IAggregate<int> {
  int Id { get; private set; }
  int AuthorUserId { get; set; }
}

Question

Given the above separation of concerns and interpretation of aggregate boundaries, how would one provide transactional support to consumers who transactionally need to create an aggregate and save its repository-generated Id in another aggregate? E.g. how can I create a User and a Blog transactionally with Blog.UserId set to User.Id?

I have come up with some answers (marked community wiki), but am posting my question here anyway to solicit feedback and more answers.

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With all due respect...this question with your own answers is like you're having a conversation with yourself. Why put a question up and then answer it? Why not just create a wiki? –  Yzmir Ramirez Jan 20 '11 at 4:25
    
Good point. Just looked it up. Apparently community wiki is no longer available: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/67039/… . What's the correct etiquette for this? I put up the question even though I have answers because I want to know what other answers exist. Should I put my answers in the question? I'd rather people be able to vote on them, not so I get reputation, but simply so I can see how they are measured by the "crowd". –  G-Wiz Jan 20 '11 at 4:40
    
Moved my own answers into the question. –  G-Wiz Jan 20 '11 at 4:57
1  
Nothing wrong with answering your own questions - see the faq - What kind of questions can I ask here?. As long as you pretend you're on Jeopardy! –  Marijn Jan 20 '11 at 11:59
1  
If you don't want rep for your answers, you can tag your answers as community wiki. See the details in the first answer to this question on meta. It's also explained how a question gets community wiki status. –  Marijn Jan 20 '11 at 12:11

3 Answers 3

Given the above separation of concerns and interpretation of aggregate boundaries, how would one provide transactional support to consumers who transactionally need to create an aggregate and save its repository-generated Id in another aggregate? E.g. how can I create a User and a Blog transactionally with Blog.UserId set to User.Id?

Thing is - aggregate is responsible to draw transactional boundaries too. That means - there should be no need to simultaneously create User with Blog and rollback User creation if Blog creation somehow fails.

If there is such a need - You are modeling aggregates wrong.


Just posting some quick comments that might be useful...

interface IAggregate<TKey> {
    TKey Id { get; }
}

Interfaces should be used to define behavior (roles) and not what implementing class will hold (knowledge about key type in this case).

Can't google quickly enough to find proper explanation why exactly it's so though... Will try later.

interface IRepository<TEntity, in TKey> where TEntity : IAggregate<TKey> {
  TEntity Get(TKey id);
  void Save(TEntity entity);
  void Remove(TEntity entity);
}

Avoid usage of generic repositories.

interface IUnitOfWork {
  void RegisterSave<TEntity>(TEntity entity);
  void RegisterRemove<TEntity>(TEntity entity);
  void RegisterUnitOfWork(IUnitOfWork uow);
  void Commit();
  void Rollback();
}

Avoid usage of unit of work (this one solves Your problem).

interface IAggregate<TSelf> where TSelf : IAggregate<TSelf>
{
    IKey<TSelf> Id { get; }
}

Keep learning. Soon enough You will stop abusing interfaces & generics. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I had the feeling that aggregate boundaries should accomodate transactional state changes. I had broken this before to improve performance when aggregate roots had hundreds of entities, although it would have been better to implement a lazy-loading proxy instead. Regardless, when using UoW without DDD, the general problem I posed still arises. –  G-Wiz Jan 23 '11 at 20:50
    
I disagree that generic repositories should necessarily be avoided. Although you wouldn't ever do anything polymorphically with them (nonsense: foreach (var r in repositories) { var e = r.Get(5); e.Id = rnd.GetNext(); r.Save(e); }) they do serve the supporting role of illucidating code intent, especially when XML documentation is added to the interface. –  G-Wiz Jan 23 '11 at 20:53
    
The unit of work link you provided does not conclusively argue to avoid UoW. In CQRS, can the execution of a command not cause multiple events to occur, all of which should be persisted atomically? –  G-Wiz Jan 23 '11 at 21:09
1  
@gWiz Genericness blurs intent. Strength of generic repository is at the same time its weakness. –  Arnis L. Jan 23 '11 at 23:50
    
Just one comment though. The main reason not to violate ARs transactionnal boundaries is to mitigate the risk of concurrency exceptions (assuming optimistic concurrency). However, the rule can be loosened when you create new ARs, since there's usually no contention when creating ARs: 2 transactions creating a User at the same time wouldn't usually collide. Therefore, it might be convenient at times to create multiple ARs in a single transaction and that shouldn't impact the system's ability to scale. However, modifying multiple ARs in a single transaction shall be avoided. –  plalx May 8 at 21:12

It seems that one of the following pattern constraints must be loosened:

  • Repository is responsible for generating aggregate IDs. Instead, a natural key must be used.
  • UoW can't register arbitrary Action delegates. Instead, allow UoW to register arbitrary Actions.
  • Inter-aggregate relationships are objectified as ID properties. Instead, use aggregate-typed properties, such as:

 

partial class Blog : IAggregate<int> { 
  User Author { get; set; } 
}

So had I interpreted the patterns incorrectly? Or are they actually limited in this regard?

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Should the ID type be smarter as a reference type? That way when the repository updates the ID, it can be accessed via reference by another aggregate. For example:

interface IKey<TAggregate> : IEquatable<IKey<TAggregate>>
{
    /* should provide a ctor that accepts a string */

    TAggregate GetAggregateType();
    string ToString();
    bool IsAssigned { get; }
}

interface IAggregate<TSelf> where TSelf : IAggregate<TSelf>
{
    IKey<TSelf> Id { get; }
}

interface IRepository<TAggregate> where TAggregate : IAggregate<TAggregate>
{
    TAggregate Get(IKey<TAggregate> id);
    void Save(TAggregate entity);
    void Remove(TAggregate entity);
}

class User : IAggregate<User>
{
    public IKey<User> Id { get; private set; }
}

class Blog : IAggregate<Blog>
{
    public IKey<Blog> Id { get; private set; }
    public IKey<User> Author { get; private set; }
}

The implementation of IKey<TAggregate> is provided in the same package as the implementations of IRepository<TAggregate>.

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