Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running Rails 2.3.5 with a MySQL database. I have a HABTM relationship between Books and Users and am trying to get all users who have a specified list of books (defined by an array of book names).

I'm able to perform a find call that retrieves this list of users:

User.find(
  :all,
  :joins      => :books,
  :conditions => { :books => { :name => book_names } }
)

However, this turns out to be extremely slow. After playing around in SQL, I found that the following call works much faster and retrieves the same results:

User.find_by_sql([
  "SELECT users.* FROM users
   INNER JOIN books_users ON users.id = books_users.user_id
   WHERE books_users.book_id IN (SELECT id FROM books WHERE books.name IN (?))",
  book_names
])

For the same query, the find call takes roughly 3000 ms on my computer whereas the find_by_sql call takes roughly 200 ms; this is an entire magnitude of speed difference. I suspect the culprit has something to do with the fact that the original find call is translated into a double INNER JOIN SQL query, equivalent to the following:

[
  "SELECT users.* FROM users
   INNER JOIN books_users ON users.id = books_users.user_id
   INNER JOIN books ON books_users.book_id = books.id
   WHERE books.name IN (?)",
  book_names
]

My questions are:

  • Does anyone know why this is the case? Why is the double INNER JOIN slower than my single INNER JOIN with a nested SELECT query?
  • The find_by_sql call is not really taking advantage of the built-in support that Rails provides for HABTM relationships. In particular, it's surfacing the books_users join table that the Rails support typically abstracts away from the developer. Is there a way to specify the same query using a find call that hides this?
share|improve this question
1  
Have you created indexes on the book_id and user_id fields for your books_users table? –  Dylan Markow Jan 20 '11 at 5:04
    
Ack... I knew I forgot something. This was it! After adding the indexes, the find query now takes 15 ms. –  Claw Jan 20 '11 at 5:36
    
@dmarkow: add it as an answer, so we can give you the points –  nathanvda Jan 20 '11 at 11:08
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After the comments above, it sounds like you need indexes on your book_id and user_id fields in books_users.

class AddIndices < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    add_index :books_users, :book_id
    add_index :books_users, :user_id
  end

  def self.down
    remove_index :books_users, :book_id
    remove_index :books_users, :user_id
  end
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

Does using :include vs. :join do the join better?

User.find(
  :all,
  :include    => :books,
  :conditions => { :books => { :name => book_names } }
)
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately no; it appears to be just as slow. –  Claw Jan 20 '11 at 5:14
add comment

dmarkow pointed me towards the culprit in his comment -- Thanks! It looks like I forgot to create indexes in the books_users table.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, i believe @dmarkow should take the credit for the answer. –  nathanvda Jan 20 '11 at 11:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.