Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following expression

(-1 + 1/p)^B/(-1 + (-1 + 1/p)^(A + B))

How can I multiply both the denominator and numberator by p^(A+B), i.e. to get rid of the denominators in both numerator and denominator? I tried varous Expand, Factor, Simplify etc. but none of them worked.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand you question, you may teach Mma some algebra:

r = {(k__ + Power[a_, b_]) Power[c_, b_] -> (k Power[c, b] + Power[a c, b]),
      p_^(a_ + b_) q_^a_ -> p^b ( q p)^(a),
      (a_ + b_) c_ -> (a c + b c)
    }

and then define

s1 = ((-1 + 1/p)^B/(-1 + (-1 + 1/p)^(A + B)))

f[a_, c_] := (Numerator[a ] c //. r)/(Denominator[a ] c //. r)

So that

f[s1, p^(A + B)]  

is

((1 - p)^B*p^A)/((1 - p)^(A + B) - p^(A + B))  

alt text

share|improve this answer
    
amazing! How did you come up with those rules? Why not other rules? –  Qiang Li Jan 22 '11 at 0:10
    
@Qiang I just did the transformation by hand and wrote down the rules I used ... not very "automatic" –  belisarius Jan 22 '11 at 0:14

I must say I did not understand the original question. However, while trying to understand the intriguing solution given by belisarius I came up with the following:

expr = (-1 + 1/p)^B/(-1 + (-1 + 1/p)^(A + B));

Together@(PowerExpand@FunctionExpand@Numerator@expr/
 PowerExpand@FunctionExpand@Denominator@expr)

Output (as given by belisarius):

alt text

Alternatively:

PowerExpand@FunctionExpand@Numerator@expr/PowerExpand@
 FunctionExpand@Denominator@expr

gives

alt text

or

FunctionExpand@Numerator@expr/FunctionExpand@Denominator@expr

alt text

Thanks to belisarius for another nice lesson in the power of Mma.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I think teaching Mma to render your formulae in "elegant" ways is more an art than a craft. –  belisarius Jan 21 '11 at 22:09

Simplify should work, but in your case it doesn't make sense to multiply numerator and denominator by p^(A+B), it doesn't cancel denominators

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.