Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

A while ago I saw something go by for 'search in project' etc support in Emacs where the definition of a project was simply looking from the current directory up til a .git or other source control directory was found.

I unfortunately didn't bookmark the project as I was off in Smalltalk land and didn't need Emacs at the time. I'd really appreciate pointers to the specific project I'm vaguely referencing or one that does the same thing. I've looked at eproject which seems close, but isn't quite what I'm remembering.

share|improve this question
1  
This might also help: emacswiki.org/emacs/Icicles_-_Support_for_Projects –  Drew Aug 20 '11 at 17:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So what I was looking for, I finally found.

Textmate minor mode:

https://github.com/defunkt/textmate.el/

share|improve this answer

Have a look at this SO question. It sounds like what you're looking for is find-file-in-project.el. The EMACS Wiki is usually a good source for this kind of question.

share|improve this answer
1  
i spent a couple hours tonight digging around in my bookmarks and on the emacs wiki. i also came across the SO question and find-file-in-project.el and neither is ringing the bell. the big thing i remember about what i'm looking for was it was hardwired to be based on source control 'artifacts' like a .git directory etc. –  Sean T Allen Jan 20 '11 at 6:28
    
Maybe thinking of CEDET? cedet.sourceforge.net –  Charlie Martin Jan 20 '11 at 15:40

You are probably looking for eproject and its eproject-find-file and/or eproject-grep functions.

share|improve this answer

I use TAGS for my project, and recently wrote this answer for igrep-in-tags, which does a regexp search through all the files in the TAGS and gives the output in a compilation style buffer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.