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void longcatislong(int* cat, int &size, int &looong)
{
    int* longcat = new int[looong*2];
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i = i + 1)
        longcat[i] = cat[i];
    delete [] cat;
    cat = longcat;
    looong = looong * 2;
}

Soup guys. I'm /r/equesting some help with this problem I have with my code. Apparently something in my C++ code caused a heap corruption error and that something is delete[] cat. cat is a dynamic array of ints that was created with the new operator and a pointer. Why, then is it that when I use the array delete the whole program decides to get crushed under a steamroller and say I got heap corruption. I'm 12 and what is this?

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6  
-1 Please keep the 4chan on 4chan. (And if you're going to try anyway, at least don't be a new---...) –  GManNickG Jan 20 '11 at 6:28
    
Don't you know the rules 1 and 2? –  Grigory Jan 20 '11 at 7:07
    
That are basically the rules for using C++ - every line IS a steamroller. –  ActiveTrayPrntrTagDataStrDrvr Jun 21 '12 at 15:06

3 Answers 3

You are passing cat pointer by value so whatever changes you do inside the function is not reflected outside. You need to pass the pointer by reference like int*& cat.

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Thanks, but it didn't work. –  im12andwhatisthis Jan 20 '11 at 6:29
1  
You are still getting heap corruption? then can you post the code which calls this function. –  Naveen Jan 20 '11 at 6:30
    
If you are deleting cat once then dont you have to allocate memory before copying some value to it. –  ckv Jan 20 '11 at 6:30
    
I don't see why that would be true. cat is simply an address that points to data. If he does a delete[] cat it should be reflected outside the function. –  Mike Bantegui Jan 20 '11 at 6:33
2  
@Sagekilla: I mean cat = longcat; will not be reflected outside and the pointer cat will be pointing to invalid memory location. –  Naveen Jan 20 '11 at 6:35

cat is not being returned to the caller of this function. You're only changing the local copy when you execute cat = longcat.

That means the parameter that you passed in to this function still points to the old address which you've very inconveniently deleted.

Either pass it in as a reference or do the old C double pointer trick and pass in its address.

You may also want to ensure that the first time you call this, cat has a valid value and that size and looong are compatible (looong * 2 >= size) lest you corrupt memory.

Have a look at the following code which illustrates your problem:

#include <iostream>
void longcatislong1(int* cat, int &size, int &looong)
{
    int* longcat = new int[looong*2];
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i = i + 1)
        longcat[i] = cat[i];
    delete [] cat;
    cat = longcat;
    looong = looong * 2;
}

void longcatislong2(int*& cat, int &size, int &looong)
{
    int* longcat = new int[looong*2];
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i = i + 1)
        longcat[i] = cat[i];
    delete [] cat;
    cat = longcat;
    looong = looong * 2;
}

int main (void) {
    int sz = 0;
    int lng = 10;
    int *ct = 0;
    std::cout << ct << std::endl;
    longcatislong1 (ct, sz, lng);
    std::cout << ct << std::endl;
    longcatislong2 (ct, sz, lng);
    std::cout << ct << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Its output is:

0
0
0x9c83060

meaning that the longcatislong1 call did not successfully set ct on return. The longcatislong2 function, which passes the pointer in as a reference, does set ct correctly.


So let's say you have a valid pointer to 0xf0000000. When you call your original function, a new memory block is allocated, the data is copied across and the old block is deleted.

But the ct variable still points to the old block.

The next time you call the function, or even if you dereference ct elsewhere, you're in for a world of pain, commonly called undefined behaviour.

By making the first parameter a reference type, changes made in the function are reflected back in the variable that was passed in.

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You should remove int* cat by int** cat in function args, and then replace all cat insertions in function body by *cat even in cat[i] placement.

void longcatislong(int** cat, int &size, int &looong)
{
    int* longcat = new int[looong*2];
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i = i + 1)
        longcat[i] = *cat[i];
    delete [] *cat;
    *cat = longcat;
    looong = looong * 2;
}

And then when you call function call it like that:

longcatislong(&cat, size, looong);
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You should either code in C or C++, not both at the same time :-) –  paxdiablo Jan 20 '11 at 6:47
    
C is fully compatible with C++, so why you think that pointer to pointer is not C++ construction? –  Ilay Jan 20 '11 at 6:58
    
@paxdiablo: implementing dynamically resized arrays yourself is not C++ anyway... –  ybungalobill Jan 20 '11 at 7:01
    
I know the language allows it, @Ilay, but it's a mindset thing. C++ has printf as well but I don't consider people to be C++ programmers if they're still using that. The bottom line is that the reference way is a lot simpler to code and less prone to annoying little "foibles" such as having to do *cat = .... And the statement "C++ is fully compatible ..." is both wrong and likely to start a religious war :-) –  paxdiablo Jan 20 '11 at 7:03
1  
You should target your answers (and read your comments) a little better. Someone who can't understand references will be unlikely to understand the concepts of double indirection. And I think you'll find the second comment on this answer has the phrase "C is fully compatible with C++". You should also learn what a smiley means at the end of a comment instead of getting so worked up. –  paxdiablo Jan 20 '11 at 7:11

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