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I am getting run time crash in the following piece of code and not able to debug also. Please review and let me know what's going on.

// CppConsole.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <assert.h> class Test : public std::tr1::enable_shared_from_this<Test> { public: Test():x(0),y(0),z(0){}; int x; float y; double z; };

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> t1(new Test);
    std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> t2 = t1->shared_from_this();
    return 0;
}

I have include all the headers and the program is compiling fine. This is the error i am getting:

CppConsole.exe - Entry Point Not Found The procedure entry point ?_Xweak@tr1@std@@YAXXZ could not be located in the dynamic link library MSVCP90D.dll

If I comment out this line

std::tr1::shared_ptr t2 = t1->shared_from_this();

the program runs without crashing.

Update: Question can be closed for now. I will try to install VS feature pack and see weather the program executes without any crashes.

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1  
You are missing template argument lists for your shared_ptr objects. Even so, there is something odd going on here. I don't see anything blatantly wrong with this, and if I add a #include <memory> and fix the declarations, I have no issues with this code under VC10 (there could be an issue in VC9, which a you are using, but that would be unusual.) What settings are you using to compile this project? If you just compile this .cpp file on the Visual Studio command line (cl test.cpp or whatever the file is named), what happens? –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 7:08
    
I am using VC9 running on WinXP SP3. I have included all the headers and compilation is not an issue. As far what i understand for creating an instance of shared pointer I don't need a template argument list. Is this correct? –  John M Jan 20 '11 at 7:14
    
No, it's not. A shared_ptr of what? That's what the template is for. Post your real exact code. –  GManNickG Jan 20 '11 at 7:20
1  
If you wouldn't mind, I'd like to see the exact, beginning to end, .cpp file that compiles without a template argument list for shared_ptr. I am fascinated that that would work. –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 7:34
2  
I don't understand. Your original code had no template argument lists in the declarations of t1 and t2 and you argued "I don't need a template argument list." Now your full piece of code has template argument lists in those declarations. However, you are still missing the <memory> header and your use of enable_shared_for_this is incorrect: this is a class template, not a class, and its usage also needs a template argument list. This code as presented should not compile. Please copy and paste your exact code that compiles. –  James McNellis Jan 20 '11 at 17:00
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5 Answers

Googled it (The procedure entry point ?_Xweak),found this : http://blog.nilretain.org/

EDIT : I Build and Run it successfully on my msvc 2008 on xp-sp3 ,which has later version of msvcp90d.dll. Maybe you can download and install the latest redist-version of msvc90 and rebuild.

EDIT: your dependencies says something is missing. check this out :

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090623140325AAInugo

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Thanks Edwin. i don't have VS service pack installed. But following your link i compiled using the macro _BIND_TO_CURRENT_CRT_VERSION but now it complains about application configuration being incorrect. I can't make heads or tails out of it. This piece of code is actually valid and can be found in MSDN site. –  John M Jan 20 '11 at 13:16
    
@John M: too bad ,it didn't work. Have Googled it. I got 132 results with the search I mentioned. I thought that the one I quoted was a general solution. But i was wrong. –  Edwin Jan 20 '11 at 13:29
    
@John M: followin the link to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc664727.aspx ,maybe you must define it as #define _BIND_TO_CURRENT_CRT_VERSION 1 –  Edwin Jan 20 '11 at 13:34
    
will install VS feature pack and see what happens. –  John M Jan 21 '11 at 11:49
    
Hey guys, just FYI my blog post you linked to lives here now: devjustinian.com/2009/12/manifest-gotchas.html (in case it scrolls off the page) I originally figured it out based on the manifest.. if things are going strangely for you, try having VS generate an external manifest and comparing the CRT version it asks for with the CRT version installed under C:\windows .. HTH! –  justinian Feb 8 '11 at 2:10
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You need a template argument:

std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> t1(new Test);
std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> t2 = t1->shared_from_this();

The compiler should report an error if it is not present. (Visual C++ 2010 does)

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The program is fine and t1 instance is getting created until I add the next line where I try to call shared_from_this() this is when the program crashes with the mentioned error. –  John M Jan 20 '11 at 7:36
1  
Ok, could you check what version of MSVCP90D.dll is being used when you run the app? (using depends.exe) I have version 9.0.30729.1 and that one includes the procedure entry point ?_Xweak@tr1@std@@YAXXZ. –  Volker Voecking Jan 20 '11 at 8:12
    
MSVCP90D.dll version loaded when it crashed 9.0.21022.8. Dependency walker complained about this Error: At least one module has an unresolved import due to a missing export function in an implicitly dependent module. –  John M Jan 20 '11 at 9:52
    
@John M: you should be able to see where that happens. –  MSalters Jan 20 '11 at 12:44
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It appears that your compiler is not linking against a DLL with the needed runtime functions. For instance, if you added the headers to your include path, but don't link to the latest version of the C++ runtime (check your project's settings), or installing the Visual C++ 2008 feature pack didn't work, or you installed the feature pack but then tried to compile from Visual Studio 2005, etc.

Basically the "process the source code (including headers)" step is working fine, but the "link all the DLLs" step is failing. And it's failing because the runtime you're linking against doesn't have the needed functions for shared_ptrs or weak_ptrs.

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Ok what are the lib files I need to link for the smart pointer to work –  John M Jan 20 '11 at 9:57
    
shared pointer and enable_shared_from_this doesn't need the Visual Studio C++ 2008 feature pack since they are already defined in Technology Review TR1 namespace. I have not installed the feature pack. The problem with the code is in line where I call shared_from_this(). Apart from that whole program executes fine. –  John M Jan 20 '11 at 10:08
1  
They are defined in TR1, but Visual Studio 2008 did not ship with TR1. Not only do you need to install the feature pack on your computer, but you also have to install a redistributable on all computers you want to run the program on. I work at a company that does exactly that. Plus, you'll see on the page that I linked to that "This feature pack also includes an implementation of TR1. ... Our implementation includes a number of important features such as ... Smart pointers." Hint: the feature pack exists because TR1 is not part of 2008 base install. –  Max Lybbert Jan 20 '11 at 16:06
    
I don't know which lib files you need, but they are part of the feature pack. Another possibility is that you somehow got the feature pack installed, had the include files added to the include path but did not get the DLLs added to the linker path. –  Max Lybbert Jan 20 '11 at 17:10
    
"The problem with the code is in line where I call shared_from_this()." I've added another answer about calling shared_from_this(), however the reason you're crashing is that shared_from_this does several things, and one of those things involves calling back into the runtime (a.k.a. MSVCP90D.dll). The thing is, your copy of MSVCP90D.dll doesn't have the function shared_from_this() needs. To get that function you'll need to install the feature pack/redistributable. –  Max Lybbert Jan 21 '11 at 0:31
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I'm looking at the code that you have posted now. I seem to remember it slightly differently. Now I am completely lost as to why you want enable_shared_from_this.

The following code should work.

// CppConsole.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <assert.h>
#include <memory>

class Test {
public:
    Test():x(0),y(0),z(0){};
    int x;
    float y;
    double z;
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> t1(new Test);
    std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> t2 = t1;
    return 0;
}

So should this:

// CppConsole.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <assert.h>
#include <memory>

class Test : public std::tr1::enable_shared_from_this<Test> {
public:
    Test():x(0),y(0),z(0){};
    std::tr1::shared<Test> GimmeAShared()
    {
        return shared_from_this();
    }
    int x;
    float y;
    double z;
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Test* foo = new Test();
    std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> t1 = foo->GimmeAShared();
    return 0;
}

Of course, in both cases I don't see why you'd want a std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test> instead of a simple Test, but that's another issue.

If you're using enable_shared_from_this as a std::tr1::shared_ptr factory, I really don't see the point. It looks like it's meant more for Test's internal use (eg., you know that Test instances will be managed through std::tr1::shared_ptr<Test>s and you want to know the current use count inside one of Test's methods, or you want to increment that use count inside one of Test's methods, etc.).

It's been a few years, and now I know better. enable_shred_from_this is meant as a std::shared_ptr factory. The basic idea is to guarantee that you won't have two (or more) shared_ptrs pointing at an object, but with different reference counts.

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I was trying to see the usage of shared_from_this. The example i pasted was from MSDN site. Still I am not getting it to execute with your changes. Getting the original error. I will try to install the feature pack and see weather this fixes the issues. –  John M Jan 21 '11 at 6:42
    
I was pretty sure you were following some example code. But I really believe shared_from_this is meant for the class's internal use; not to hand out shared_ptrs. –  Max Lybbert Jan 21 '11 at 8:01
    
Thanks Max, will do some reading on shared_from_this. How its use is going to help. –  John M Jan 21 '11 at 11:46
    
Oops. Had to change the second example because shared_ptrs, by default, delete what they point to, so foo can't be allocated on the stack. –  Max Lybbert Jan 21 '11 at 16:26
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I had this problem when developing under M$ Windows SP3 with M$ Visual Studio 2008. I tried and combined many hints that I could find on the web. To no avail. The solution was simple, I had to install SP1 pack for M$ Visual Studio 2008!

The thing is that my external DLLs used C++ TR1 functions that I was not aware of. The M$ Visual Studio 2008 without SP does not have the right runtime DLLs.

So, just make sure you have that SP1 for your M$ Visual Studio 2008 first before trying any other solution.

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