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filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(style=1,opacity=80 ); opacity: 0.5; -moz-opacity: 0.5

This works well with IE but I want this to work in mozilla also. What is the solution?

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I got the answer background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(left,black,white) – Poornima Jan 20 '11 at 9:37
    
@Poomina that is in no way relevant to the code you posted – Sean Patrick Floyd Jan 20 '11 at 9:56
    
I need to apply filtering and style for an element and instead of giving filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(style=1,opacity=80 ); we can give like background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(left,black,white) for mozilla. mozilla does not support filter as far as i heard. -moz-opacity can be given but for giving gradient effects and all we need to apply the above said style – Poornima Jan 20 '11 at 16:38

These are three definitions that do the same thing:

filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(style=1,opacity=80 ); // IE only
opacity: 0.5; // CSS 2, FireFox supports this from version 3
-moz-opacity: 0.5 // FireFox only, pre 3.x versions

See opacity on QuirksMode, CSS compatibility on QuirksMode

So, it does work in Mozilla FireFox in versions 3.x and higher.

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I got the answer background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(left,black,white) – Poornima Jan 20 '11 at 9:54

opacity:0.5 should be working in mozilla, see https://developer.mozilla.org/en/CSS/opacity

Have you ran firebug or anything to see if the another style is being applied?

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I got the answer. background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(left,black,white) – Poornima Jan 20 '11 at 9:54

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