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On linux

file1.s:

.text
.globl MyFunc
Func:
        ....
 call my_jump
 ret  

file2.h:

extern "C" FUNC_NO_RETURN  void  my_jump();

file3.cpp:

extern "C" __attribute__((noinline)) void my_jump()
{
     return;
}

when linking my module which calls "MyFunc", i get the following error: (previosly before adding a call to my_jump inside the asm code, everything was OK)

"relocation R_X86_64_PC32 against 'longjmp_hack' can not be used when making a shared object; recompile with -fPIC"

any ideas?

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More info needed: - do you use GCC or do you use LD directly to link the objects? Also, which commandline paramaters do you use? - Why the "attribute((noinline))" statement? –  Jeroen Jacobs Jan 20 '11 at 10:25
3  
Did you try re-compiling with -fPIC ??? –  Paul R Jan 20 '11 at 10:30
    
I am using g++ for linkage.i found out that i need to add attribute ((visibility ("hidden"))) my function declaration in file2.h. however, i cannot figure out why do i need that, since i as i read this flag suppose to aggregate different function declarations to the same object within shared object linkage, but i define this function only once! –  sramij Jan 22 '11 at 11:48

1 Answer 1

Removing the FUNC_NO_RETURN from file2.h

e.g. file2.h:

extern "C" void my_jump();

and file4.c:

#include "file2.h"  
extern "C" void MyFunc();  
main(){  
   MyFunc();  
}

and fixing the typo in the file1.s :

.text  
.globl MyFunc  
MyFunc:  
  call my_jump  
  ret  

and it all compile fine for me....

g++ file1.s file3.cpp file4.c -o a.out

Version of compiler;

$ g++ --version
g++ (GCC) 4.6.2 20111027 (Red Hat 4.6.2-1)

Linux version: 3.1.5-6.fc16.x86_64

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