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The easy answer is to have an interface with all the regular operations which also includes a stop() method.

interface Service {
   operation( parameters ...);
   somethingElse( parameters ... );

   stop();
}

The main problem with the stop method is that most clients who get a reference to a Service should probably not also be able to stop the service.

Another alternative is to simply define two interfaces, the service and the Stoppable

interface Service {
    operation( parameters ...);
    somethingElse( parameters ... );
}

interface Stoppable {
    void stop();
}

The only problem with this approach is if the implementation is wrapped by another Service, then the stop method is hidden away.

The original problem of stopping clients from "stopping" your service is still possible, they just need to first check if the reference is an instance of Stoppable and then they can "stop" it.

How would you solve this problem?

I have an idea which solves the problem elegantly (well for me) without leaving a public stop available. However before I show it, I'd like some ideas.

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1  
I'm curious to see your elegant solution to the problem. –  Falanwe Jan 20 '11 at 10:43

2 Answers 2

Use interface inheritance:

interface Service {
    operation( parameters ...);
    somethingElse( parameters ... );
}


interface StoppableService extends Service {
    void stop();
}

Clients that only need the raw Service get given that by an appropriate factory method. Anything that should be able to stop the service, request the StoppableService.

If you are worried about clients casting to StoppableService can calling stop(), then you'll need your concrete implementations to separate out this function. Give them a concrete implementation that has a no-op version of stop(). You can still have your factory provide a working implementation of stop() to anyone who should be able stop it. Perhaps when they ask for an implementation from your factory, they can pass in appropriate credentials so you can determine what they should be able to do and give them the correct version.

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You will need to give examples for your last paragraph of ideas. –  mP. Jan 20 '11 at 14:03
    
If i understand your saying that the factory returns either a Service or StoppableService depending on some magic credentials. This is imho flawed because anyone using that factory wants a Service, introducing credentials into this means the solution gets messy as we now have to manage what credentials are sufficient to get a stoppable. Most things that should be able to call stoppable, dont care for the Service part, they only want a Stoppable for when they want to stop() it. Its bad practice to mix two unrelated interfaces together. –  mP. Jan 20 '11 at 22:03
    
Thus if your doign some lifecycle handling you are getting more than just a Stoppable, your factory know in effect supplies two different unrelated types of things - a Service and a Stoppable. yuck! –  mP. Jan 20 '11 at 22:19
    
@mP - If you want to keep Service and Stoppable for the reasons given, fair enough. The original question didn't make it particularly clear. I could help explain the factory part but given I've already been downvoted already (I'm guessing by you, apologies if not), I'm not hugely motivated to do so. –  GaryF Jan 21 '11 at 11:46

You could do something like

interface Service {
    operation( parameters ...);
    somethingElse( parameters ... );

    <E> E getControlInterface(Class<E> clazz);
}

and then

Stoppable stoppable = service.getControlInterface(Stoppable.class);
if (stoppable != null) {
    stoppable.stop();
}

But I think this is overcomplicating, implementing Stoppable interface should be enough. The wrappers should be aware of Stoppable and implement it also.

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My q said that regular clients should not be able to get to call stop() themselves. With your proposal, they can call stop after calling service.getControlInterface... –  mP. Jan 20 '11 at 22:02
    
What is the point of passing a Stoppable.class to getControlInterface ? Waht possible other parameter could i pass, tehre should only ever be a single answer so its pointless to ask. –  mP. Jan 20 '11 at 22:18
    
who is 'regular' and who's not? you need some kind of authentication and authorization here. it's not language nor design pattern question. –  pingw33n Jan 20 '11 at 22:20

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