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How do I achieve colspan/rowspan behavior in tableless (e.g. div.table {display: table;} div.tr {display: table-row;} etc.) table?

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1  
What's a tableless table? –  BoltClock Jan 20 '11 at 10:40
2  
Don't be frightened of using tables, they are designed to display data but not ideal for layouts. –  nik0lias Jan 20 '11 at 10:43
1  
Put stripes on donkey and you'll get something that looks like a Zebra. But it's not a Zebra. Same way div that looks like a table is not a table and will never be. For stuff like colspan and rowspan simply use real table. –  Shadow Wizard Jan 20 '11 at 10:48
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I think there are justifications for using <div> for tabular data. How can you achieve drag/drop with <tr> elements? Sometimes this is a requirement. –  aw crud Aug 31 '11 at 15:15
    
@Renderin: you can. Check out jquery ui drag and drop for instance. –  artemave Sep 1 '11 at 21:24

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I would imagine that this would be covered by CSS Tables, a specification which, while mentioned on the CSS homepage, appears to currently be at a state of "not yet published in any form"

In practical terms, you can't achieve this at present.

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13  
Is this still the case? –  mattblang Mar 21 '13 at 19:18

So basically, you've turned all your <table>, <tr> and <td> elements into <div> elements, and styled them to work exactly like the original table elements they've replaced?

What's the point in that?

It sounds like someone's told you that you shouldn't be using tables in modern web design, which is sort of right, but not in this way -- what you've done doesn't actually change anything about your code. It certainly hasn't got rid of the table; it's just made it harder to read.

The true meaning of the point about not using tables in modern sites is to achieve the page layout you want without using the kind of layout techniques that involve setting out a grid of table cells.

This is achieved by using position styles and float styles, and a number of others, but certainly not display:table-cell; etc. All of this can be achieved without ever needing colspans or rowspans.

On the other hand, if you are trying to place an actual block of tabular data on the page - for instance a list of items and prices in a shopping basket, or a set of statistics, etc, then a table is still the correct solution. Tables were not removed from HTML, because they are still relevant and still useful. The point is that it is fine to use them, but only in places where you are actually display a table of data.

The short answer to your question is I don't think you can -- colspan and rowspan are specific to tables. If you want to carry on using them, you will need to use tables.

If your page layout is such that it relies on tables, there really isn't any point doing a half-way house effort to get rid of the table elements without reworking how the layout is done. It doesn't achieve anything.

Hope that helps.

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8  
The point in that is that the semantics of an element and the way it renders are different. If the CSS specification had reached a stage where it expressed everything relating to presentation that was implied by table markup, and browsers had caught up, then it would be an excellent way to get the benefits of table layouts (resizing elements that stick together along specified edges) without the semantic disadvantages (the telling out outright lies about the meaning of the data). –  Quentin Jan 20 '11 at 19:15
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@Spudley - Even though in most cases using <table> is better for tabular presentation, there are some cases I've encountered where the CSS way seems more appropriate. For example - if you have multiple, but similar looking forms that you want to display in a nice tabular manner there is no way to achieve that using the tables alone because only one form can be wrapped around one table. You could have multiple tables - one for each form, but they wouldn't look as neat without some CSS adjusting, and the CSS/DIV way is actually a better way to go in those cases. –  techexpert May 21 '12 at 5:29
    
Addionally, unlike "HTML tables", "CSS tables" may have "implied" elements. That is, you can just add a single display: table-cell; element without surrounding rows and tables, and it will be well-formed. –  WGH Oct 2 '13 at 11:03
column-span: all; /* W3C */
-webkit-column-span: all; /* Safari & Chrome */
-moz-column-span: all; /* Firefox */
-ms-column-span: all; /* Internet Explorer */
-o-column-span: all; /* Opera */

http://www.quackit.com/css/css3/properties/css_column-span.cfm

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2  
It doesn't have anything to do with CSS tables, it's multi-column layout which is a completely different layout model. Also, for some reason, it allows the element to span only all columns, so you can't use it to even emulate colspan="2" in a 3-column-table, for example. –  Ilya Streltsyn Aug 22 '13 at 14:49

Trying to think in tableless design does not mean that you can not use tables :)

It is only that you can think of it that tabular data can be presented in a table, and that other elements (mostly div's) are used to create the layout of the page.

So I should say that you have to read some information on styling with div-elements, or use this page as a good example page!

Good luck ;)

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+1 for the link –  artemave Jan 20 '11 at 11:55

<div style="clear:both;"></div> - may do the trick in some cases; not a "colspan" but may help achieve what you are looking for...

<div id="table">
    <div class="table_row">
        <div class="table_cell1"></div>
        <div class="table_cell2"></div>
        <div class="table_cell3"></div>
    </div>
    <div class="table_row">
        <div class="table_cell1"></div>
        <div class="table_cell2"></div>
        <div class="table_cell3"></div>
    </div>

<!-- clear:both will clear any float direction to default, and
prevent the previously defined floats from affecting other elements -->
    <div style="clear:both;"></div>

    <div class="table_row">
<!-- the float is cleared, you could have 4 divs (columns) or
just one with 100% width -->
        <div class="table_cell123"></div>
    </div>
</div>
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Nice! Here it is in action: jsfiddle.net/EGx2H –  artemave Apr 29 '12 at 19:52
2  
The "colspan" row causes the first cell above it to expand. jsfiddle.net/EGx2H/159 –  allicarn Feb 1 '13 at 15:08

You could always use CSS to simply adjust the width and the height of those elements that you want to do a colspan and rowspan and then simply omit displaying the overlapped DIVs. For example:

<div class = 'td colspan3 rowspan5'> Some data </div>

<style>

 .td
 {
   display: table-cell;
 }

 .colspan3
 {
   width: 300px; /*3 times the standard cell width of 100px - colspan3 */
 }

 .rowspan5
 {
   height: 500px; /* 5 times the standard height of a cell - rowspan5 */
 }

</style>
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In order to get "colspan" functionality out of div based tabular layout, you need to abandon the use of the display:table | display:row styles. Especially in cases where each data item spans more than one row and you need different sized "cells" in each row.

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you can simply use two table divs, for instance:

<div style="display:table; width:450px; margin:0 auto; margin-top:30px; ">
   <div style="display:table-row">
        <div style="width:50%">element1</div>
        <div style="width:50%">element2</div>
   </div>
</div>
<div style="display:table; width:450px; margin:0 auto;">
   <div style="display:table-row">
        <div style="width:100%">element1</div>
   </div>
</div>

works great!

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