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written below is a crude code i wrote for accessing a serial port. attached to that port is a microcontroller that sends me data and having a baud rate of 57600. i ran the code once and got results but after closing the window, my computer hanged. i pressed ctrl+alt+del and saw that under processes my program was still running. i cant close it too.

int n = 20;
char szBuff[20 + 1] = {0};

HANDLE hSerial;
DCB dcbSerialParams = {0};
COMMTIMEOUTS timeouts={0};
DWORD dwBytesRead = 20;

dcbSerialParams.DCBlength=sizeof(DCB);

hSerial = CreateFile("COM5",
                 GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE,
                 0,
                 0,
                 OPEN_EXISTING,
                 FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL,
                 0);


if(hSerial==INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
  if(GetLastError()==ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND)
  {
    puts ("cannot open port!");
  }

  puts ("invalid handle value!");                                 
}

if (!GetCommState(hSerial, &dcbSerialParams)) 
{
  puts ("error getting state");
}

dcbSerialParams.BaudRate=CBR_57600;
dcbSerialParams.ByteSize=8;
dcbSerialParams.StopBits=ONESTOPBIT;
dcbSerialParams.Parity=NOPARITY;

if(!SetCommState(hSerial, &dcbSerialParams))
{
  puts ("error setting port state");
}


while (1)
{

  if(!ReadFile(hSerial, szBuff, n, &dwBytesRead, NULL)){
     puts ("serial read error fail!");
  } 

  else
  {
     printf ("%s\n" , szBuff);
  }

}
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1  
you're using while 1, how do you expect your program to close? –  stijn Jan 20 '11 at 10:50
    
i want to continuously read the data from the port, i suppose i am doing it wrong. can you tell me how i can do this more efficiently? –  user582485 Jan 20 '11 at 10:51
    
it's not per se wrong, but you need some way to tell the program when to stop.. eg instead of puts ("serial read error fail!"); use puts ("serial read error fail!"); break; this should already (if I'm correct) exit the loop when the serial device fails or is disconnected. –  stijn Jan 20 '11 at 11:42
    
oh nice catch sir. reading works fine now. i do however have a new problem. the way im sending data off the microcontroller is by this format: $A.B.C$ followed by a newline. so its 7 bytes right? i set the 3rd argument for readfile to 20, greater than 7 bytes so that i can succesfully read all of the data string. however reading sometimes misses a few characters. instead of reading $A.B.C$ i read in one line $A.B.C and in the line after that $ (a hidden'\n'). how can i fix this? –  user582485 Jan 20 '11 at 11:53
    
@user582485: It's a valid question. But you put it in the comment secion of another question. Please don't; there's no good place for answers. Make it another question instead. StackOverflow doesn't have a limit on the number of questions you may ask. –  MSalters Jan 20 '11 at 12:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That sounds like a buggy serial port driver. See Why do some process stay in Task Manager after they've been killed?. When you kill your program, it doesn't go away until all of its pending I/O operations have been canceled.

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Probably is, but he's still trying to read from it even after the port goes lame (nothing breaks out of the while loop on error). –  Tim Post Jan 24 '11 at 21:36
    
@Tim: A program that that loops forever isn't inherently buggy, it could just be designed to only to end when killed forcefully such as tail -f. And since this program is blocking on I/O, it's not spinning and eating up 100% CPU. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 24 '11 at 22:08
    
I do agree, it's likely a buggy driver. I can finally add the +1 to go with my comment now that I have votes again, yippie! –  Tim Post Jan 25 '11 at 0:39

You MUST to define some type of stop to the app if it will loop in a while(1).

Option 1: The microcontroller must send a terminate command or character that you use to break the while.

Option 2: Some type of timeout instead while(1).

Option 3: Catch some signal and then break the while().

And there are a lot of other options.

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