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Suppose you are given an input string:

"my name is vikas"

Suggest an algorithm to modify it to:

"name vikas"

Which means remove words having length <=2 or say k characters, to make it generic.

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The best answer is going to be language-dependant. It's not language-agnostic enough. –  marcog Jan 20 '11 at 11:45
    
    
@marcog: Thanks, it's really not a homework question. This question is generated in my mind when I noticed that, sometimes when you put a question at some forum, they trim the string whatever suitable to make it a link in the address bar, so out of curiosity I started thinking for the approach and hence the question. –  Vikas Jan 20 '11 at 11:49
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you can do this in-place in O(n) time. Iterate over the string, keeping a pointer to begining the word you're processing. If you find that the length of the word is greater than k, you overwrite the begining of the string with this word. Here's a C code (it assumes that each word is separated by exacly on space):

void modify(char *s, int k){

    int n = strlen(s);
    int j = 0, cnt = 0, r = 0, prev = -1;
    s[n++] = ' ';  // Setinel to avoid special case
    for(int i=0; i<n; i++){
        if(s[i] == ' '){
            if (cnt > k){
                if(r > 0) s[r++] = ' ';
                while(j < i) s[r++] = s[j++];
            }       
            cnt = 0;
        }
        else {
            if (prev == ' ') j = i;
            cnt++;
        }
        prev = s[i];
    }
    s[r] = '\0';
}
int main(){

    char s[] = "my name is vikas";
    modify(s, 2);
    printf("%s\n", s);
}
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 "a short sentence of words" split ' ' filter {_.length > 2} mkString " "

(Scala)

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Iterate over individual characters of String keeping the current position in the string and the "current word", accumulate all current words with length >= k, reassemble String from accumulated words?

This algorithm uses in-place rewriting and minimizes the number of copies between elements:

    final int k = 2;

    char[] test = "     my name     is el   jenso    ".toCharArray();
    int l = test.length;
    int pos = 0;
    int cwPos = 0;
    int copyPos = 0;

    while (pos < l)
    {
        if (Character.isWhitespace(test[pos]))
        {
            int r = pos - cwPos;
            if (r - 1 < k)
            {
                copyPos -= r;
                cwPos = ++pos;
            }
            else
            {
                cwPos = ++pos;
                test[copyPos++] = ' ';
            }
        }   
        else
        {
            test[copyPos++] = test[pos++];
        }
    }

    System.out.println(new String(test, 0, copyPos));
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@eljenso: This seems O(n) space approach. Suggest me something w/o extra space. –  Vikas Jan 20 '11 at 11:53
    
The definition of word is key here. What about ,an? –  Björn Pollex Jan 20 '11 at 11:56
1  
Iterate over string, keeping current pos and "current word start pos", if you encounter a word with length < k delete corresponding chars from String in place? –  eljenso Jan 20 '11 at 11:58
    
@Space_C0wb0y: surely that depends on how the asker defines it. However it is defined it should be easy enough to program it into the login here. –  Chris Jan 20 '11 at 12:05
1  
@eljenso: do you know how programming languages would deal with deleting chunks from the middle of a string? Do they just remove them, shuffle up the other data and job done or do they put nulls into the string that are ignored on processing or something? There is a part of me that feels this isn't a simple thing for a language but that part of me is almost certainly wrong so I am seeking education. :) –  Chris Jan 20 '11 at 12:07
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split() by " " and omit if length() <= 2

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Something like that will suffice (time complexity is optimal, I guess):

input
 .Split(' ')
 .Where(s => s.Length > k)
 .Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (sb, s) => sb.Append(s))
 .ToString()

What about space complexity? Well, this can run in O(k) (we can't count size of input and output, of course), if you think about it. It won't in .NET, because Split makes actual array. But you can build iterators instead. And if you imagine the string is just iterator over characters, it will become O(1) algorithm.

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