Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Some programmers like to set a pointer variable to null after releasing the pointee:

delete ptr;
ptr = 0;

If someone tries to release the pointee again, nothing will happen. In my opinion, this is wrong. Accessing a pointer after the pointee has been released is a bug, and bugs should jump in your face ASAP.

Is there an alternative value I could assign to a pointer variable that designates released pointees?

delete ptr;
ptr = SOME_MAGIC_VALUE;

Ideally, I would want Visual Studio 2008 to tell me "The program has been terminated because you tried to access an already released pointee here!" in debug mode.


Okay, it seems I have to do the checking myself. Anything wrong with the following template?

template <typename T>
void sole_delete(T*& p)
{
    if (p)
    {
        delete p;
        p = 0;
    }
    else
    {
        std::cerr << "pointee has already been released!\n";
        abort();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
"The program has been terminated because you tried to access an already released pointee here!" Doesn't the debug runtime already do that if you leave the pointer as-is? However I wouldn't want double-release to actually fail in a release build - it's probably still worth doing the =NULLs for release. –  Rup Jan 20 '11 at 11:45
2  
@Rup: That's not reliable, since the heap could have reused memory at that location and it is accessible then. –  sharptooth Jan 20 '11 at 11:47
1  
You could provide a custom delete operator for debugging purposes, that checks for just that. –  Björn Pollex Jan 20 '11 at 11:48
    
Not 100%, but it is better than 'has someone else allocated any memory?', it's 'has someone else allocated memory at the exact same pointer address'. It puts a magic header before and after every allocation to spot things like this. –  Rup Jan 20 '11 at 11:49
    
IRT your edit, looks good to me. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 12:59
add comment

12 Answers 12

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No. Test for "0" when trying to delete something if you really want to warn or error out about it.

Alternatively, during development you could omit ptr = 0; and rely on valgrind to tell you where and when you're attempting a double free. Just be sure to put the ptr = 0; back for release.

Edit Yes, people I know C++ doesn't require a test around delete 0;

I am not suggesting if (ptr != 0) delete ptr;. I am suggesting if (ptr == 0) { some user error that the OP asked for } delete ptr;

share|improve this answer
    
deleting a NULL pointer is not an error in C++, it is a no-op. –  CashCow Jan 20 '11 at 11:54
1  
@CashCow: Yes, I am well aware of that. It's still a code smell at best. If he wants to error out when trying to delete 0, then he can do that. If he doesn't, then great! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 11:58
1  
In C++, "Test for "0" when trying to delete" is not needed. –  Nawaz Jan 20 '11 at 12:00
5  
@Nawaz: I know this. C++ does not require it. But if he wants to make some kind of error or warning to the user just before delete 0 -- presuming that ending up in this scenario was the result of a bug -- then, he can do this. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 12:08
2  
Hmm.. I understand it now. :-) –  Nawaz Jan 20 '11 at 12:32
add comment

Assign NULL after releasing a pointer. And before using it, check for its NULLity.. If it is null, report an error by yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being right. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 12:11
    
Don't use NULL in C++. Use 0 or nullptr. –  Axel Gneiting Jan 20 '11 at 12:14
2  
@Axel please take out any personal wisdoms in disguise. NULL is perfectly fine to use, and is much easier to transit from when you want to replace uses to nullptr. I hereby declare my personal wisdom as such and prefer to use 0. But I don't want to put it up as a fact. I do know it has some drawbacks. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 20 '11 at 12:22
2  
-1 for advice that promotes both bugs and complexity. when you null a pointer you prevent detection of multiple-deletion bug. reasoning that sloppy code bug will be detected by a prudent nullpointer check in that sloppy code, is invalid. so is reasoning that copies of the pointer don't exist. and validity-checks everywhere increases complexity, which leads to new bugs. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 20 '11 at 14:03
add comment

Is there an alternative value I could assign to a pointer variable that designates released pointees?

Ideally, I would want Visual Studio 2008 to tell me "The program has been terminated because you tried to access an already released pointee here!" in debug mode.

You get this very likely by just doing delete ptr. The run-time will catch you if you double-delete this pointer.

Anyway, I don't think I have written ptr = NULL more than a handful of times in the last decade. Why would I do this? Such a pointer is certainly hidden within an object whose destructor will delete the object it refers to, and after that destructor has been invoked the pointer is gone, too.

And if some circumstances would require me to leave a pointer to hang around after the pointee has been deleted, I wouldn't set it to NULL simply because I would want the code to crash ASAP if I'd double-delete. Setting the pointer to NULL just masks an error.

Of course, all this doesn't mean that one wouldn't want a pointer that might be explicitly set to "nothing", and use NULL for that. But not to mask a double-deletion error.

share|improve this answer
add comment

No, calling delete on a null pointer is perfectly normal from C++ point of view. Assigning some magic value will break code severely - you'll now have to distinguish between null pointers, valid pointers and magic value pointers and I guess it will be a huge mess.

If you really oppose deleting a null pointer you can have a separate boolean flag together with each pointer meaning that it has been deleted. Perhaps you could write a wrapper class for that.

share|improve this answer
1  
“is perfectly normal” – well. It is well-defined. But I wouldn’t say normal, I’d say that having double delete in code usually points to a design flaw (except, say, on a smart pointer that supports a release method but arguably this is also a flawed design since it invalidates a live object). –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 20 '11 at 11:49
    
That's his point, though - he wants to mark this pointer as invalid so any accidental double free will crash and he can catch it. He doesn't want the null pointer behaviour. –  Rup Jan 20 '11 at 11:50
1  
@Rup: The null pointer behaviour is EXACTLY what he's asking for; he's just failed to consider that he might have to do the checking-for-a-bug himself. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 11:51
1  
@Konrad Rudolph: Note I said "normal from C++ point of view", not "just normal". I mean this is how C++ works, so trying to oppose this in a constructive way is not easy. –  sharptooth Jan 20 '11 at 11:56
1  
@sharptooth: Complete nonsense. if (ptr == 0) { std::cerr << "Hmm, the pointer you're about to delete has previously been deleted. You have a bug somewhere, maybe..." << std::endl; } delete ptr; is very easy. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 12:10
show 11 more comments

If you just want to check allocations and deletions the easiest way is to write your own global operator new and operator delete and manually keep track of all pointers that are allocated and deallocated.

Of course, you can also use an existing tool that does that for you, e.g. Valgrind.

If you also want to protocol each pointer access, this gets hairy. You essentially have to either patch the executable or execute it in a virtual machine where each pointer access is redirected to your bookkeeping routine.

But once again, existing tools such as Valgrind already do that for you. In the case of Valgrind, your executable is run inside a virtual machine; other programs go the way of patching your application by modifying the byte code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

When you delete a pointer in debug mode, many compilers will paint the bytes with some values to indicate the memory as "invalid" in case you try to read it. Of course genuine memory may have those bytes, so it allocates a bit extra to indicate whether the pointer you are reading is valid or not, and paints the bytes you do not directly access.

It is not wrong to call delete multiple times on the same pointer (variable) just on what it points to.

Maybe this isn't the best way to do this but it's totally legal of course...

T * array[N];
for( i = 0; i < N; ++ i )
{
   array[i] = new T;
}
T* ptr;
for( i = 0; i < N; ++i )
{
  ptr = array[i];
  delete ptr;
}

and apart from not being the best way to do things, I am calling delete on the variable "ptr" multiple times but on different addresses and clearly not an error.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the debug CRT uses 0xdd to fill freed objects. But that won't invalidate the pointer he's got unless that pointer is itself in a deleted object. –  Rup Jan 20 '11 at 11:51
    
There is nothing wrong with the pointer variable itself, only what it is pointing to. As soon as you reassign it to point elsewhere what it pointed to previously is now irrelevant to this particular variable. That is the point I am trying to make. –  CashCow Jan 20 '11 at 12:15
add comment

I think sharptooth already provided a valid answer, but I think he failed to spell it out explicitly:

If it is an error in your code to access a pointer variable after its object has been deleted via that pointer variable, then you have to add some checking yourself. (Possibly via some flag.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Answering the question in question[sic].

No, there's no established value for released pointers.

I think any access to an invalid pointer (like NULL) should be noted - not only accessing them after release, which may never happen if no (non-NULL) initialization takes place. The debugger is bound to warn you when you try to access a null pointer - if it doesn't, you shouldn't be using it.

edit: end of answering the original question; rambling about double-delete

It really depends on the design if delete on NULL is a bug waiting to happen. In many cases it's not. Perhaps you should use "safe delete" when that is needed - or while debugging? Like this:

template <typename T>
void safe_delete(T*& ptr)
{
  if (ptr == 0)
    throw std::runtime_error("Deleting NULL!");
  delete ptr;
  ptr = 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

There is no point.

I won't enter the apparently rather hot conversation going on, just point out an obvious fact: pointers are passed by copy.

With some code, it gives:

T* p = /* something */;
T* q = p;

delete q;
q = 0;

Do you feel safe ?

The problem is that you have no way to ensure that your magic value has been propagated to all pointers to the object.

This is like plugging a hole in a sieve and hoping it'll stop the water from pouring out.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In C++0x, you can

delete ptr;
ptr = nullptr;
share|improve this answer
2  
Which is exactly the same here in principle as ptr = NULL; and will result in the pointer having the same value in memory (which, incidentally, is not necessarily 0). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 11:59
add comment

Setting the pointer to a specific value will only affect this copy of the pointer, so it provides nearly no protection. If the program needs to be verifiably correct, there are smart pointer classes that track copies of the pointer and invalidate those, otherwise I'd just recommend a tool like Valgrind (on Linux) or Rational Purify (on Windows) that will let you check for memory access errors.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It’s not an error to delete a nullpointer; by definition it does nothing.

Generally it’s a Bad Idea™ to null pointer variables after delete, because there the only effect it can have is to hide a bug that causes multiple deletion (with the pointer variable nulled the second deletion will have no effect, instead of e.g. crashing).

Generally, nulling of pointers belongs, in my view, with all the other Microsoft’isms such as Hungarian notation and extensive use of macros.

It’s something that may once have had a good rationale, but which today, as of 2011, just has negative effects, and is used out of sheer inertia: idea propagation of the same kind that Knuth once described for random generators – the almost worst possible one gaining popularity and then incorporated as the default generator in umpteen language implementations and libraries, with most people thinking the extensive usage meant it had to be at least reasonable.

However, having said that, for the person who leans towards the ultra-formally pedantic it can be at least an emotionally satisfying idea to null pointers in e.g. a std::vector, after delete. The reason is that the Holy Standard, ISO/IEC 14882, allows the std::vector destructor to do rather unholy things, such as copying the pointer values around. And in the formally pedantic view, even such copying of invalid pointer values incurs Undefined Behavior. Not that it is a practical concern. First of all I know of absolutely no modern platform where copying would have any ill effect, and secondly so much code relies on standard containers behaving reasonably that they just have to: otherwise, nobody would use such an implementation.

Cheers & hth.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess the random generator story is somewhat analogous to how SO users with relatively high rep are seen as "knowledgeable" or "correct", often simply because they've been around for longer or have gotten more involved in more questions. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 14:08
    
BTW ignoring the standard and relying on "what happens in practice" is dangerous, and leads to code that - in ten years' time - requires further debugging and maintenance to see what has gone wrong, when you could easily have just written it formally correctly in the first place. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 14:09
    
@Tomalak: I don't know why I see your comment, I thought I'd ignored you. But given that I see it: I have not written what you imply. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 20 '11 at 14:12
    
@Alf: Why the comment about ignoring here? What was the purpose of that? There is no need to bring personal issues onto an answer's comment thread. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 20 '11 at 14:14
    
@Alf "It’s not an error to delete a nullpointer; by definition it does nothing.". That's totally wrong. Whether it's right or wrong to delete the pointer is up to the domain you talk about. In a particular program, deleting a null pointer may just be outright wrong. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 20 '11 at 14:58
show 7 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.