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Let's say I have a several step process like during software installation for example.

Each step display a text box and wait for the user to click the "next" button.

The standard way to do it is to have a callback like this:

process
{
   Dialog1() // Will call callback2 when closed
}

callback2()
{
   Dialog2()  // Will call callback3 when closed
}

callbak3()
{
   Dialog3()  // Will call callback4 when closed
}

This technique makes the code quite unreadable when there is a lot of steps as you have to divide you process into each successive callback function (not to mention save context from one to another).

What would be an easier to read way to do it ? Ideally the process should read like this:

process()
{
   Dialog1()
   callback1() // stop method until closed
   Dialog2()
   callback2()  // stop method until closed
   Dialog3()
   callback3()  // stop method until closed
}

Problem with this is that you can't stop the UI thread. Any idea or work around would be very appreciated.

PS: this as to work in C or Objective C

ANSWER

So after having discovered coroutines thanks to Martin B I've found this page: http://stackoverflow.com/posts/4746722/edit and ended up using this code:

define coRoutineBegin static int state=0; switch(state) { case 0:
define yield do { state=__LINE__; return; 
                    case __LINE__:; } while (0);

define coRoutineEnd }

void process()
{
    coRoutineBegin

    Dialog1()
    yield
    Dialog2()
    yield
    Dialog3()
    yield
    Dialog4()
        yield

    coRoutineEnd
}
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I hate C for not having functional constructs. This can be perfectly expressed in functional languages (eg. javascript) using continuations. –  Alexandre C. Jan 20 '11 at 12:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're looking for coroutines, which provide exactly the concept you're looking for: Yielding control from a function without exiting it. In essence, your code would look like this:

process()
{
   Dialog1()
   yield
   Dialog2()
   yield
   Dialog3()
}

Unfortunately, coroutines aren't supported natively by C or Objective C and are hard to implement generically without resorting to ugly hacks. However, you may be able to take the concept as a starting point for a special-case construct for your situation.

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1  
Actually, designing dialogs the "callbacks" way is called continuation passing style (google this term). Coroutines are usually implemented using CPS. One good way is to pass the callback describing what to do next (the continuation) to the dialog routines. The problem is that C doesn't have the functional constructs to do this cleanly. –  Alexandre C. Jan 20 '11 at 12:19
    
That looks very interesting. I've never heard of coroutines before. –  CodeFlakes Jan 20 '11 at 13:56

You could use a Mutex or similar concept where the dialog is opened and run in a different thread.

Here is a post with an example I think is valid:

Synchronization/wait design for cross-thread event signaling (Obj-C)?

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I don't quite understand the problem. Why doesn't showing a modal dialog work? Modal dialogs block until they are dismissed so your logic would look like:

Dialog1()
Dialog2()
Dialog3()

Another solution is to have your dialogs or callbacks or whatever send events. You then bind to those events. Your main logic would then look like this (sorry, I don't know how to do GUI examples in C/Objective-C, so I'll use Tcl/Tk because its highly readable):

bind $rootWindow <<Step1>> showDialog1
bind $rootWindow <<Step2>> showDialog2
bind $rootWidow <<Step3>> showDialog3
# kick off the first step
event generate $rootWindow <<Step1>> 

The showDialogX functions would do whatever they need to do, then generate an event saying "I'm done, ready for the next step".

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