Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two classes A and B and A is base class of B.

I read that all methods in Python are virtual.

So how do I call a method of the base because when I try to call it, the method of the derived class is called as expected?

>>> class A(object):
    def print_it(self):
        print 'A'


>>> class B(A):
    def print_it(self):
        print 'B'


>>> x = B()
>>> x.print_it()
B
>>> x.A ???
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Using super:

>>> class A(object):
...     def print_it(self):
...             print 'A'
... 
>>> class B(A):
...     def print_it(self):
...             print 'B'
... 
>>> x = B()
>>> x.print_it()                # calls derived class method as expected
B
>>> super(B, x).print_it()      # calls base class method
A
share|improve this answer

Two ways:


>>> A.print_it(x)
'A'
>>> super(B, x).print_it()
'A'

share|improve this answer
1  
Is the first way passing x as the self parameter? I didn't know you could do that... –  Wilduck Jan 20 '11 at 15:47
    
@Wilduck. Good question, do you know the answer on that one? –  magu_ Mar 23 at 8:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.